COMMENTS

All you need to know when visiting the home of LEGO in Billund, Denmark

Billund in Denmark is the home of Lego.

It is where the very first Lego toy brick was made in 1932. And where the first Legoland Park opened on June 7, 1968, next to the original Lego factory.

Legoland Billund is smaller, flatter and easier to get around than Legoland Windsor. Plus it’s just a 90-minute flight from the UK so makes a great alternative for Lego fans.

If you are planning a visit to Legoland Billund, make sure you read our 14 top tips below first and then our review.

1. How to get to Legoland Billund in Denmark

Legoland Billund is across the road from Billund Airport. You can fly there from Manchester, Heathrow and Stansted Airports. Ryanair fly from Stansted and Sun-Air, a British Airways partner, goes from Heathrow and Manchester.

We flew direct from Manchester with Sun-Air (which works in partnership with BA) on a tiny plane. The flight took 90 minutes.

2. Where to stay

It is expensive but you can stay stay at the park – at Legoland Hotel or Legoland Castle Hotel, a stay which can include park tickets, parking and early park access.

There is also Legoland Holiday Village, 450 metres from the entrance to Legoland.

But we stayed over the road at Lalandia Billund – an amazing water park resort, so got the best of both worlds. We stayed in a fantastic two-bedroomed lodge.

Lalandia

Lalandia

3. Best time to go to Legoland Billund

The busiest days at Legoland Billund are Tuesdays and Wednesdays while Saturdays are the quietest.

MORE:  Children’s television favourite Peppa Pig inspires families with her top 25 adventures to have around England

If you want to go over the summer, go as late as you can as Danish children usually go back to school towards the end of August so it will be quieter.

We found queues manageable despite visiting during the Easter holidays – there are lots of rides and plenty of space.

4. How to avoid the queues

Most people enter the park and start going on rides as soon as they see them so head straight to the back to avoid the crowds.

The longest queues when we went were in the Ninjago area which did mean a wait for Lloyd’s Laser Maze and the Ninjago Ride.

The Ninjago Ride

The Ninjago Ride

If you have Ninjago fans you could head there as soon as the gates open. Alternatively, the most popular rides are often quieter in the last 30 minutes before the park closes, although you may miss out altogether if you leave it too late.

To really save time queuing, splash out on the Q-Bot Reserve and Ride system. Instead of waiting in a queue at each attraction, you spend the waiting time elsewhere in the park. An Express pass reduces your waiting time by 50 per cent and an Ultimate pass means almost no waits in queues on your chosen rides, which can be a game changer when you have young children.

MORE:  We review a water park holiday resort opposite LEGOLAND in Denmark called Lalandia Billund

5. Layout

Legoland Billund is divided into themed areas.

The Miniland area is at its heart with recreations of everything from old Amsterdam to Star Wars, made out of Lego, which everyone will enjoy.

This park uses 65 million of the little bricks to build its displays.

There is a Duplo Land, Imagination Zone, Pirate Land, Knights’ Kingdom, Polar Land and Legoredo Town.

Duplo Land at Lego Billund

Duplo Land

Lego Ninjago World and Adventure Land are really popular.

Our favourite ride was the competitive Falck Fire Engine in Adventure Land. You work with your family to use a pump to move a fire engine and then spray out ‘fires’ while racing against other visitors on their fire engines.

Falck Fire Engine ride

Falck Fire Engine ride

The farthest end of the park is the quietest and we found a nice picnic spot by the penguin enclosure where we could watch them swimming while we ate.

6. Age appropriate

Unlike some theme parks, there is lots for little ones including Duplo Land for toddlers and Imagination Zone.

There are also enough rollercoasters to keep teenagers happy – so this suits all ages from two to 16.

A rollercoaster at Legoland Billund

There’s plenty for older children

Don’t forget to be aware of height and age restrictions, so children aren’t left disappointed on the day.

MORE:  A family holiday in the Cotswolds - read about our stay at a fabulous farm cottage and the attractions we visited with our children

7. Food and drink

There are food and drink outfits but the options can be pricey. Plus they get very busy after 12.30pm so take your own food and drinks where possible, to enjoy in one of the picnic areas.

8. Language

This is obviously a Danish theme park but some of the 4D films are in English – check the times for these in advance.

9. Pushchairs

It’s a nice flat theme park and not overly huge but if little one’s legs get tired, there are pushchairs to hire.

10. Aquarium

If the weather is bad or you want a break from the rides then there is a good aquarium in the Imagination Zone called Atlantis by Sea Life.

Atlantis by Sea Life in Legoland Billund

Atlantis by Sea Life

It takes you on an expedition under the sea with a few bricks to find along the way. It doesn’t take very long but is a good spot to dry off or warm up and includes a tunnel under the water.

11. Special needs

The park is flat and all roads and paths are paved so wheelchairs users can go everywhere.

Those with a hidden disability such as anxiety, autism or ADHD can collect a ’show consideration’ wristband.

Disabled and ’show consideration’ access to rides is via the exits or sometimes through the Q-bot entrance.

MORE:  Holiday fun with our children on a family holiday to Lake Garda and Verona

12. Buying tickets

Buy online to save money and to save time queuing for tickets and download the free, official app to plan your trip.

13. Don’t miss the new Lego House

If you are after another Lego experience – try the big Lego House, which has opened in Billund and is within walking distance of Legoland.

This 12,000-square-metre house is filled with 25 million Lego bricks.

Here, children learn through play with Lego. The house also includes three restaurants and a Lego store.

Lego House in Billund

Lego House

14. The history

You can go to other Legoland parks, but only one place is the home of Lego.

Almost every visitor stops for an iconic photo outside the main entrance sign. Save time getting in by doing this at the end of the day not the beginning, when the shot will be more clear of people.

Conclusion

This park is not huge but it is historic and has enough to keep you entertained for a full day or a couple of days.

Advance entry starts from around 300DKK – about £30 – per person. For tickets and information visit the Legoland Billund website.

RELATED CONTENT: Will the home of LEGO live up to children’s expectations on a trip to LEGOLAND in Denmark?

RELATED CONTENT: We review a water park holiday resort opposite LEGOLAND in Denmark called Lalandia Billund

The entrance to Legoland in Billund, Denmark, when it opened in 1968/1969.

The entrance to Legoland when it opened in 1968/1969.



We visited as guests of the park to review it, all views are our own.

MORE: Our 10 top tips for taking children on a canal boat holiday

The Family Holiday Guide Email

The best news, reviews, ideas and

tips to help you enjoy

fabulous family holidays.