EUROPE / HOLLAND NETHERLANDS

Finding the real tv Hunter Street house in Amsterdam

Finding the real tv Hunter Street house in Amsterdam

We take our children in search of the actual Hunter Street house in the Netherlands

Hunter Street is a popular Nickelodeon/TeenNick children’s television series, set in Amsterdam.

The first series started in March, 2017 when a boy called Max joins the Hunter family.

When he and the four other children Anika, Sal, Tess, and Daniel, wake up the next morning, they discover that their foster parents Erik and Kate have disappeared.

They turn detectives to try to find out what happened to them while keeping up appearances that everything is fine.

It’s a family adventure following clues, boat racing through canals, exploring tunnels and finding lost treasure while fighting off bad guys.

Their grand home also houses a museum, which the family run.

In real life though, the Hunter House exterior is a real home.

Our two children love this comedy/drama so when we visited Amsterdam they were keen to find this actual Hunter House.

The address is Singel 140-142, a small canalside road just outside the heart of the city.

We got there via a tram to Nieuwezijds Kolk stop and it was then about a five-minute walk, through some side streets and over a canal.

The exterior of the actual Hunter Street house from the Nickelodeon tv series

It’s a big, tall building on the canal. Our children were excited to see it and enjoyed having their picture taken outside but did complain the black door in the series had been painted dark green!

The house is private property so you won’t be able to go in and see inside.

Plus you won’t spot any of the stars as the actual show is filmed elsewhere in the Netherlands, in Aalsmeer.

The exterior of the actual Hunter Street house from the Nickelodeon television series

Hunter Street stars Stony Blyden, Mae Mae Renfrow, Kyra Smith, Thomas Jansen, and Daan Creyghton. Wilson Radjou-Pujalte and Kate Bensdorp join the cast in the second season, and Eliyha Altena and Sarah Nauta join in the third season.

It is produced in the Netherlands by Blooming Media and was co-developed with the Nickelodeon Netherlands television series De Ludwigs.

RELATED CONTENT: Amsterdam’s top attractions and activities for children

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Deserts, fairytales and glamping – a family trip to Efteling and the Brabant region of Holland.

Deserts, fairytales and glamping – a family trip to Efteling and the Brabant region of Holland.

We stay at a holiday park in the middle of the Netherlands with our children

Sand stretches before us. A vast expanse of gold, nothing on the horizon save for a makeshift den of withered tree branches.

Where is this extraordinary landscape? The Sahara? Outer Mongolia?

Try central Holland, the Dunes of Loon.

This natural phenomenon was created by sand drifts 10,000 years ago and its 30km of desert are fun to explore.

the Dunes of Loon in Drunen National Park

Dunes of Loon

You experience it by walking just five minutes from our family campsite at Duinhoeve (read our full Duinhoeve Holiday Park review and tips here).

And we certainly feel like explorers as we unzip the door to our glamping lodge at the park.

Our glamping lodge at Duinhoeve holiday park in Holland/The Netherlands

Our glamping lodge at Duinhoeve

From the outside it is a huge tent, but through the zipped entrance you find a fabulous, modern interior.

There are three bedrooms, a den/storage area for children, spacious shower and bathroom, TV, well-equipped kitchen and large dining table. See our video below.

The park is ideal for younger children with three playgrounds aimed at under-7s and two swimming pools – one large and heated by solar power, the other for toddlers complete with pirate ship.

There’s a restaurant/cafe selling hot and cold meals every evening.

There’s also bike and go-kart hire. Very useful as Duinhoeve is well located to explore what the natural world has to offer with cycle paths and walks through the dunes and woodland.

If you want to experience further afield then the small medieval city of Den Bosch is less than 30 minutes away.

The cathedral city of Den Bosch

Den Bosch

If you are browsing its ancients streets, squares and markets don’t forget to try the local delicacy Bosch Bollen – a type of giant profiterole sold in every bakery.

Bosche Bollen, yum

The city was home to the medieval painter Hieronymus Bosch, famous for his fantastical imagination.

And if it is a wild imagination you want to witness, then just 10 minutes from Duinhoeve is the fairytale themed theme park of Efteling (full review and top tips for visiting Efteling here).

Children at Efteling Theme Park

Efteling Theme Park

Think Disneyland minus the schmaltz, the sky high food prices and super-long queues.

Not that Efteling is quiet, it is still Holland’s largest theme park and draws visitors from around Europe.

The best place to get a feel for Efteling is the Fairytale Forest with recreations of Sleeping Beauty’s castle, Pinocchio’s workshop and the witch’s gingerbread house from Hansel and Gretel, which even smells authentic.

The park is broadly divided into two halves, to the left of the entrance is mostly aimed at younger children. Head right if you have roller-coaster loving tweens and teens who are seeking plenty of thrills. See our exclusive video below.

With our younger ones, some of the best rides are Symphonica – a theatrical indoor adventure and the Pirana River Rapids Ride.

If you need a break, there are plenty of places to sit and rest. You can hop on a steam train around the park, take a leisurely boat ride on a lake, or head up the pagoda viewing tower to see Efteling from above.

When you are hungry you can pick from plenty of food options with more than just the usual expensive fast-food.

A day at Efteling ends with a 15-minute fire and water show called Aquanura, set to classical music.

Efteling is a reminder that this area – capable of extraordinary landscapes is also pretty good at man-made mythical lands as well.

Aquanura water show at Efteling

Aquanura water show

There’s more water and drama back at our glamping lodge that night.

After days of humidity, a terrific thunder storm breaks out. As we look out across the park, enjoying the sight and the sound of the rain hammering on the canvas roof, we are very glad to be in safe and secure in our very, very posh tent.

*This was the second of a two-part holiday to Holland, starting in Amsterdam, read the first part here: Is Amsterdam child-friendly? We take a family trip to the beautiful capital of the Netherlands to find out

*We travelled via mini-cruise with DFDS – read about our journey here: We review a mini-cruise from Newcastle to Amsterdam with DFDS ferry operator

RELATED CONTENT: Amsterdam’s top attractions and activities for children

RELATED CONTENT: Our full guide to getting around Amsterdam with children

RELATED CONTENT: Amsterdam’s park and ride service – all you need to know

RELATED CONTENT: We review Efteling – the biggest theme park in the Netherlands – and give our top tips for visiting

RELATED CONTENT: We review a mini-cruise from Newcastle to Amsterdam with DFDS ferry operator

(We received complimentary accommodation, tickets to Efteling and ferry crossing, all views are our own).

Is Amsterdam child-friendly? We take a family trip to the beautiful capital of the Netherlands to find out

Is Amsterdam child-friendly? We take a family trip to the beautiful capital of the Netherlands to find out

We take our children via mini-cruise to Amsterdam in Holland

Amsterdam may be a stag and hen do favourite – but there is much more to the city than its infamous seedier side.

We head to the beautiful Dutch capital with our children, in search of a family-friendly break.

It’s just a short, 45-minute plane journey from the UK. So we decide to travel by ship. Obviously.

Billed as a mini-cruise, our overnight ferry crossing is with DFDS from Newcastle.

Our cabin on the Princess Seaways

Our cabin

The children love it and it doesn’t feel like part of the journey – more a highlight of the holiday.

It sets sail at 5.30pm, so enough time to explore the ship, eat and enjoy the entertainment.

Then most of the journey is spent asleep in our cabin, before waking up for breakfast and disembarkment. Read our review and tips for taking this ferry crossing here and watch our video below.

Our visit to the Netherlands is in two parts so it’s a bonus to have our car and lots of luggage.

Part 1 Amsterdam

There are bicycles EVERYWHERE we look. I’m expecting this but am still staggered at the sheer volume of cyclists, their confidence and the natural way they rule the road.

Bicycles parked in Amsterdam

All ages are on two wheels, children too young to pedal themselves ride on a seat or in a trailer with an adult.

And NOBODY wears a helmet.

It’s a stressful city for car drivers to negotiate – it’s also difficult and expensive to park.

So we use a cheap park and ride car park on the outskirts (read our Amsterdam park and ride guide here) and take a couple of trams to our hotel.

NH Amsterdam Center is a good base to explore from plus it was great value when we booked. (See our full hotel review and pictures here).

A suite at NH Amsterdam Centre hotel

Our hotel room

It’s a well-positioned hotel next to Leidseplein square in Amsterdam, across the road from canal cruises, within five minutes’ walk of Vondelpark, Rijksmuseum and the Van Gogh Museum. Plus, our room is huge.

Then, armed with an I amsterdam city card, which gives free access to attractions, public transport including ferries and a free canal cruise, we start our exploring.

We tick off Nemo Science Museum, a great hands-on attraction, where our children even get to be scientists in a lab.

Nemo Science Museum exterior

Nemo Science Museum

We take a pancake cruise – a 75-minute cruise – with all you can eat pancakes and toppings. None of us get near to the record of 15. Then, part of the boat’s floor opens up to reveal a ball bit below deck.

The Pancake Boat

The Pancake Boat

We pop to see the outside of the real-life Hunter Street house from the Nickelodeon programme of the same name.

And we get close to nature at Artis Zoo – a beautiful attraction, with some species you don’t get to see in English zoos.

Less child-oriented but a must-see for art lovers, is the Van Gogh Museum which houses the biggest collection of the Dutch painter’s work in the world. Even his famous work Sunflowers is there when we visit.

We use our cruise tickets (free with the I amsterdam card), with the Blue Boat Company. The cruise really caters for children – they have their own Pirates commentary on headphones and goody bags.

The Blue Boat Company in Amsterdam

The Blue Boat Company

Read our complete reviews and guides to Amsterdam’s children’s attractions here and watch our video below.

We get around by trams and on foot (read Our full guide to getting around Amsterdam with children).

Walking is a great way to see the city and the canals but it’s a challenge to negotiate the roads and crossings with children, remembering to check the cycle lanes and look out for trams as well as other traffic.

Amsterdam is fascinating, brilliant and intensive and when it’s time for part two of our trip, all four of us are ready to head south.

Go to Part 2: Deserts, fairytales and glamping – a family trip to Efteling and the Brabant region of Holland.

RELATED CONTENT: Amsterdam’s top attractions and activities for children

RELATED CONTENT: Our full guide to getting around Amsterdam with children

RELATED CONTENT: Amsterdam’s park and ride service – all you need to know

RELATED CONTENT: We review Efteling – the biggest theme park in the Netherlands – and give our top tips for visiting

RELATED CONTENT: We review a mini-cruise from Newcastle to Amsterdam with DFDS ferry operator

(We received complimentary ferry crossing and two i amsterdam cards, all views are our own).

We review Efteling – the biggest theme park in the Netherlands – and give our top tips for visiting

We review Efteling – the biggest theme park in the Netherlands – and give our top tips for visiting

We take our children to the fairytale-themed Efteling Theme Park Resort in Holland

Name

Efteling Theme Park Resort.

What is it?

This is a huge fairytale-themed family attraction. It’s the biggest theme park in the Netherlands and is open every day of the year.

Where is it?

In the town of Kaatsheuvel in the Brabant region of south central Holland. Just over an hour’s drive from Amsterdam and Rotterdam.

What did we think?

This is a great theme park for all ages – it feels Disney-like and magical as you walk in with music playing around you, but it is much quicker to park and get into than Disney parks.

Navigation around it was made easier as the left-hand side is largely suited to younger children and the right has more for teenagers and older children with more rollercoasters and bigger rides.

Our highlights

*The fairytale forest – you wander through a wooded area, seeing recreations of fairy tales like Rapunzel and Sleeping Beauty and some we had not heard of before. The commentary is in Dutch but there are written descriptions in English.

Hansel and Gretel in Fairytale Forest

Hansel and Gretel in Fairytale Forest

*There is lots for younger visitors, we saw three carousels alone. There are some lovely gentle rides, plus a little train.

*Comfort – there are lots of shaded areas and it’s big, it didn’t feel cramped at all.

*Carnaval Festival – a nice gentle ride, with music, through different countries.

*Symphonia ride – this had the longest queue, it is a theatrical, dark, indoor ride suitable for the whole family but scary in parts for some young children.

*The Aquanura water show is a great way to finish a day at the park. It is normally on at around 7.15pm and 8.15pm on a lake near the exit. It’s along the theme of the Princess and the Frog. Water shoots out of giant frogs’ mouths and from the middle of the lake while classical music plays.
There are lots of vantage points to get a good view.

Aquanura water show at Efteling

Aquanura water show

Top tips

*Check when the Dutch holidays are, we went at the end of the summer holidays when local children had already returned to school so it wasn’t too busy.

*The best place to start with younger children is the Fairytale Forest. Climb into Sleeping Beauty’s castle and see Rapunzel leaning out of her tower while the witch climbs up. It is a good gentle introduction for younger children to what the park is all about.

*If you’ve got a picnic and don’t want to stop to eat it, you could eat during the lake cruise – you sit on a boat being led around a track for 20 minutes. It’s a good spot for a rest as its also next to a pagoda, which takes you high above the park, giving you a good view of everything.

The pagoda at Efteling Theme Park in the Netherlands/Holland

Pagoda

*A lot of the signs have an English version and staff speak good English. But a lot of the commentary and shows are in Dutch.

*Parking is well-organised. It costs 10/12 euros to park, you pay at the entrance/exit and use your ticket to open the barrier when you leave.

*Use the Efteling app, it is simple and straightforward. It shows you where you are on a map, gives up-to-date ride queue times and basic information about each ride to assess its suitability for your children.

*There are no fast track passes or similar (except for disabled visitors), other than the Python rollercoaster where you can book a ride time.

*Baby switch is available for two adults who have a baby and both want to go on a ride – one queues and the other waits at the exit with the baby and they can then swap with the new adult going in through the exit.

*You can rent wooden pushchairs/strollers for 4 euros.

*All toilets in the park have at least one baby changing cubicle.

*Restaurant staff can warm up water, milk or food for babies.

You can stay overnight in a hotel or holiday home with unlimited access to the park.

Good rides and areas for children aged under six

*Fairytale Forest – walk through recreations of famous fairy tales.

*Stoomcarrousel – a big undercover carousel (there are others in the park too).

*Avonturendoolhof – adventure maze – look out for the bridge where you will get wet!

*Stoomtrein – the train – it does a circuit of the park and there are two stops so you can use it to get from one area to another or stay on for the duration to rest your legs.

*Kleuterhof – the playground.

*De Oude Tufferbaan – classic car ride – children feel like they are driving the cars themselves and even have their own horn.

*The monorail.

Older children, teenagers and thrillseekers

There are plenty of bigger, faster rides for those that want them including the Python roller coaster and the Baron 1898 Dive Coaster. There’s a pirate ship, water rides and more.

Roller coasters at Efteling Theme Park in the Netherlands/Holland

Efteling Theme Park Resort information

Food: The cost of food is good and there is a wide variety of choice including a Vietnamese food stand, a Dutch pancake house and restaurants.

There are lots of ice cream stands (good value at around €1.50 for an ice cream) including one where you pick a flavour of whipped ice cream and FIVE toppings which get mixed together, yum!

But it was also great to see fresh fruit and vegetable stalls at a fair price – a punnet of strawberries was 3.45 euros.

We ate an evening meal at Octopus restaurant, before watching the water show at the end of the day. Billed as an ‘underwater’ restaurant (it’s not but it is really quirky, dimly lit with moving animals  and play areas), fresh pasta and a drink for children was around 6 euros.

There are also nice picnic spots.

Opening hours: Opens at 10am and closes at 6pm during the week and later at the weekends, depending on the season.

Cost: Tickets are 42 euros. Children aged three and under are free. You can buy a parking ticket in advance for 12.50 euros.

Best for: Aged four and above.

Time needed: At least one full day.

Access and restrictions: Accessibility is very good and most rides have wheelchair entrances to get on rides without a long queue. These are available to all with physical or learning disabilities. You must register at guest services where you are given a card to present to ride attendants showing them, then you wait at the disabled entrance.

There are plenty of toilets around the park and this being Holland, the park is mostly flat and easy to get around.

Address: Efteling Park, Europalaan 1 5171 KW Kaatsheuvel, Netherlands.

Read our full review of this visit to the Netherlands: Deserts, fairytales and glamping – a family trip to Efteling and the Brabant region of Holland.

We stayed at Duinhoeve Holiday Park near Efteling, read our review and tips here: A holiday park in Holland next to the ‘Dutch desert’ – we review Duinhoeve and give our top tips for a family holiday there with children

We travelled to Holland by ferry on a mini-cruise, read all the details here: We review a mini-cruise from Newcastle to Amsterdam with DFDS ferry operator

We spent the first part of our holiday in Amsterdam: Is Amsterdam child-friendly? We take a family trip to the beautiful capital of the Netherlands to find out

RELATED CONTENT: Amsterdam’s top attractions and activities for children

RELATED CONTENT: Our full guide to getting around Amsterdam with children

RELATED CONTENT: Amsterdam’s park and ride service – all you need to know

(We received free entry to Efteling, all views are our own).

 

We review a mini-cruise from Newcastle to Amsterdam with DFDS ferry operator

We review a mini-cruise from Newcastle to Amsterdam with DFDS ferry operator

We take our children across the North Sea on an overnight ferry from England to Amsterdam

Ferry operator

DFDS

Our journey

Newcastle to Amsterdam

The service

This route runs every day linking England and Holland/The Netherlands, with overnight crossings both ways. The ports are North Shields near Newcastle and Ijmuiden ferry port in the Netherlands.

Journey time

15 hours 30 minutes.

The ship leaves at 5pm from Newcastle and arrives in Holland at 9.45am local time. Returning, the ship leaves Holland at 5.30pm and returns to Newcastle at 9.15am.

The ferry

There are two ships which operate this crossing – we sailed out with the ship Princess Seaways and back with King Seaways.

DFDS calls them cruise ferries because of the facilities and entertainment on board.

They each have 140 crew. The King takes 1,300 passengers and the Princess 1,250.

We thought that they were great ships and our children loved exploring them. There is plenty to occupy a family between boarding time and bedtime.

Facilities

The ships each have two restaurants, a cinema, play areas, games rooms, a small casino, bars, a club and a shop.

There is good entertainment on board. Our children took part in children’s entertainment on King Seaways and enjoyed it. The play areas and games rooms were slightly bigger on the King.

A play area on the King Seaways ship

A play area on the King Seaways ship

Food (same on both)

*Explorer’s Kitchen – a buffet restaurant for breakfast and dinner which we tried on King Seaways. Perfect for families, not too formal with lots of choice.

Ice cream bar in the Explorer's Kitchen on King Seaways

For dinner, there is a variety of foods from different parts of the world including Chinese, Indian, German, Dutch, Italian and British. There’s an ice cream bar, where you can order your own soft scoop flavour with a selection of toppings.

*North Sea Bistro – we ate here on Princess Seaways. It is formal with table service – the food was more expensive but delicious.

North Sea Bistro

North Sea Bistro

There is a three-course menu for adults featuring steak, sea bass and other upmarket options.

The children’s menu offers two courses for £11.95 from a starter, main and dessert. Main course options included spaghetti Bolognese and a burger. Pancakes for pudding went down well with our pair.

My dessert at North Sea Bistro

My delicious dessert at North Sea Bistro

*Coffee Crew – a café next to the play areas which serves snacks.

Our cabin

All the cabins are en suite, ours were five-berth – with two bunk beds – a double on one side and triple on the other! The bathroom has a shower. Towels and bedding are provided.

Our 5-berth cabin on Princess Seaways

Our cabin on Princess Seaways

Cabins are well located away from all the communal areas.

Who can travel?

Cars, caravans, motorcycles, bicycles, motorhomes and lorries can all use the ferry or foot passengers without a vehicle.

How does it work?

You check-in at the port in North Shields near Newcastle, at least 45 minutes before departure – and if you are in a car or other vehicle, drive to a vehicle check-in booth, open the window and hand over your passports to be checked.

You are given boarding cards which are also your cabin keys. There are lots of crew around to direct you into a lane and then on to the ship. You are told exactly where to park, the crew guide you as far forward as possible in your lane in order to fit all the cars on board. Remember your deck number so you can find your car quickly again in the morning!

Foot passengers check in at the passenger terminal.

Disabled facilities

There are six disabled cabins on King Seaways and three on the Princess. There are lifts and disabled toilets.

Benefits

It may take longer than flying but there are lots of benefits to the ferry:

*You have your own car, so you don’t need to rent or worry about children’s car seats in Holland.

*You can pack more luggage – there is unlimited baggage on board.

*You can take bikes and scooters.

*You can take pets. Pets can travel on board in their own area or there are even pet-friendly cabins. Make sure you are up-to-date on requirements for pet passports and vaccinations.

*The mini-cruise is a fun experience, part of the holiday rather than the journey.

Top tips

*We headed for the ports both ends early to make sure we arrived in time and then stretched our legs on a beach – at Long Sands beach in Tynemouth near Newcastle and Zandvoort beach on the way to Ijmuiden port in Holland.

Long Sands Beach, Tynemouth

Long Sands Beach, Tynemouth

*Keep an eye on young children outside on the ships, it can get very windy. Also, the doors to outside are very heavy to open and may slam shut.

*The car deck is locked once the ship sets sail. You can’t return to your car then so make sure you have everything with you that you need. We packed a separate bag for the cruise so we didn’t have too much to carry.

*Don’t book a restaurant time until half an hour after sailing time if you want to enjoy the ship setting off.

*There are a lot of stairs but lifts are available if you have a buggy or a pram and there would be room for a pushchair in the five-berth cabins we had.

*The restaurants are fantastic but bring water/drinks and food from the car for your cabin to save money. You are not allowed to take your own alcohol.

*Breakfast can get very busy. There is an announcement at 8am to wake everyone up so lots of passengers eat after that. The quiet period, where you are more likely to get a window seat to enjoy the sea view, is 7am to 7.45am. Also 9am is quieter – but you are called to your car as soon as the ship docks, around 9.15am.

*Don’t feel you need to rush to your car as soon as they announce it as you will be sitting in it for some time, wait a few minutes, but not too long!

In conclusion

A great experience for the children and a fun way to travel to Amsterdam. This really makes the journey a fun part of the holiday rather than a chore.

Prices from £81, via the DFDS website.

Read about our holiday in Amsterdam here: Is Amsterdam child-friendly? We take a family trip to the beautiful capital of the Netherlands to find out

Our visit to the Netherlands was in two parts, read about our second adventure here: Deserts, fairytales and glamping – a family trip to Efteling and the Brabant region of Holland.

DFDS ferry/mini-cruise from Newcastle to Amsterdam, crossing the North Sea

RELATED CONTENT: Amsterdam’s top attractions and activities for children

RELATED CONTENT: Our full guide to getting around Amsterdam with children

RELATED CONTENT: Amsterdam’s park and ride service – all you need to know

RELATED CONTENT: We review Efteling – the biggest theme park in the Netherlands – and give our top tips for visiting

(We received a free ferry trip for the purposes of this review, all views, as ever, are our own).

Amsterdam’s top attractions and activities for children

Amsterdam’s top attractions and activities for children

What to do with children in Amsterdam – our reviews and top tips

Amsterdam isn’t just for hen and stag dos, it is a family-friendly city with lots for children to do. We had a great time with our two, here’s our video and lots of information below about what we recommend.

NEMO Science Museum

This is a fantastic hands-on museum. NEMO looks like a giant ship rising from the harbour where it is situated. Inside there are four floors of interactive activities.

Floor one demonstrates how science works with pulleys, the chance to create electricity and an hourly show which is great fun, showing how a chain reaction works. One young volunteer gets to set off a reaction which spreads around the stage.

Floor two explains everyday technology such as how water is purified – children can collect water in a bucket and tip it in and out of various systems. There is also a great perspective room with altered height ceilings and angles where you can make children look like giants and turn the adults tiny.

The third floor has a display about planets and a brilliant science lab. The whole family put lab coats and goggles on to create their own experiments showing how rockets can fire and how sun cream works. It is hands-on learning at its best.

The fourth floor was closed when we visited but will be all about the human body.

There is a fifth floor with a nice cafe – the food is good quality with a wide variety. And don’t miss the roof terrace, especially on a sunny day – take your food out there to eat. There are panoramic views of Amsterdam and children can play in various water features.

Nemo Science Museum roof terrace

NEMO Science Museum roof terrace

*Entrance to the museum is free with an I amsterdam card or book tickets via their website.

Hunter Street house

The popular Nickelodeon children’s series Hunter Street is set in Amsterdam. The actual show is filmed elsewhere in the Netherlands but the exterior of the Hunter house is a real home.

A girl stands in front of the real Hunter Street house from the television series

The Hunter Street house

It is at Singel 140-142, a small canalside road just outside the heart of the city.

It is best reached via a tram to Nieuwezijds Kolk stop and is then about a five-minute walk, through some side streets and over a canal. Our children enjoyed having their picture taken outside but did complain the black door in the series had been painted dark green!

For our full story on the Hunter Street house click here.

Pancake Boat

This is a great way to mix a river cruise, meal and a soft play.

The Pancake Boat

The Pancake Boat

De Pannenkoekenboot (Pancake Boat) is moored across the IJ river from Amsterdam Centraal Station (catch the free NDSM ferry 906 from the far left pontoon at the station).

It is a 75-minute cruise along the river past Amsterdam Central Station. Once on board you can eat as many proper Dutch pancakes as you want (the record is a huge 15, which considering how filling they are is barely believable). There are three types of pancake – plain, with apple and one with bacon – plus lots of toppings you can put on.

Pancake toppings on the pancake boat in Amsterdam

About 30 minutes into the cruise, they open a big ball pit with slide in the bowels of the boat, which kept our daughter entertained for most of the rest of the journey.

Tip: There are two levels – the top deck is cooler and has better views but the pancakes and ball pit are downstairs. But once you have eaten you can sit wherever you want.

Cruise times vary but there are at least four a day in high season, book via their site

ARTIS Zoo

This glorious zoo in the centre of Amsterdam is a tropical delight to walk through. It has some of the usual animals you see at English zoos such as elephants and giraffes but other species you don’t see very often.

I liked seeing the armadillos – having only ‘seen’ one before when Ross dressed up as the holiday armadillo on Friends!

Fennec foxes

Fennec foxes

Little Fennec foxes with huge ears and a black jaguar were other highlights.

We also felt we could get much closer to the animals than usual. There are a few areas under cover, great for hot or rainy days, including a big space to watch the sea lions underwater.

Entry to the zoo is free with an I amsterdam card or book via the zoo’s website.

Van Gogh Museum

This popular museum houses the largest collection of works by Van Gogh in the world – over 200 paintings, 500 drawings and 700 of his letters.

It is a wonderful collection including famous paintings like Almond Blossom, Sunflowers (which was on temporary exhibition) and my daughter’s favourite there, The Bedroom.

The Bedroom by Van Gogh

The Bedroom (credit: Van Gogh Museum, Amsterdam)

But it is not ideal territory for a lot of children, you may have to work hard to sustain their interest.

The museum is fairly spacious and if they are old enough, we would recommend the audio guide (5 euros for adults, free for children aged 6 to 12) to keep them interested for longer.

Once they have seen enough of the artwork, the Van Gogh Museum does have a couple of good areas for little ones. They can pose in front of a giant sunflower picture in the entrance hall and also the shop has an easel where they can sketch their own portrait.

Children can enter for free so if they get fed up it isn’t the end of the world. It isn’t a huge museum, so you can get around it in an hour.

Book a time slot in advance – if you have an I amsterdam card, book through their link not on the museum website.

Pirate Canal cruise – Blue Boat Company Kids Cruise

You have to do a canal cruise in Amsterdam and this was the only company we found which specifically catered for children.

Despite being a 75-minute journey, our two were entertained throughout.

The Blue Boat Company in Amsterdam

The Blue Boat Company

Every passenger gets a new set of headphones to plug in and listen to a commentary in a language of their choice. But there is also a great children’s Pirate commentary to select (in English).

And children are given an activity pack including binoculars and an activity book with answers to be heard within the commentary.

Plus, our captain was very accommodating and happy to chat and answer questions and also pointed out places of interest along the route.

Most tables are under cover, there is also space to sit at the back in the open, plus there’s a toilet on board.

The cruise is a great way to see life in Amsterdam.

This cruise is free with an I amsterdam card which offers one free standard canal cruise per ticket. Or book via the website.

Parks

There are lots of parks to enjoy in Amsterdam to stretch young legs, including the largest, Vondelpark.

Vondelpark in Amsterdam

Vondelpark (credit: Klapfilm.nl)

It is the most popular park in the Netherlands and has a great children’s play area. The main areas for children are in the centre of the park.

Many of Amsterdam’s parks have small petting zoos, one of the largest Amstelpark, to the south of the city centre also has a small train to ride.

I amsterdam cards

The simplest and most cost-effective way of getting to around Amsterdam’s attractions is with an I amsterdam cty card. You can buy then in 24 hour periods for as long as you need.

The card includes one free canal cruise, public transport around the city centre and access to more than 40 museums.

We used a 72-hour card for two adults but not for our children as a lot of museums are free to children and a public transport ticket is only four euros per day.

We found that three was the magic number to save money. If you are going to visit more than three attractions on the I amsterdam list (all major attractions are included except the Anne Frank House), then you will definitely save money.

*Read the full review of our stay in Amsterdam here: Is Amsterdam child-friendly? We take a family trip to the beautiful capital of the Netherlands to find out

*Read about our journey to Amsterdam via mini-cruise: We review a mini-cruise from Newcastle to Amsterdam with DFDS ferry operator

RELATED CONTENT: Our full guide to getting around Amsterdam with children

RELATED CONTENT: Amsterdam’s park and ride service – all you need to know

RELATED CONTENT: We review Efteling – the biggest theme park in the Netherlands – and give our top tips for visiting

RELATED CONTENT: Deserts, fairytales and glamping – a family trip to Efteling and the Brabant region of Holland.

Have you been to Amsterdam with children? What did they enjoy most?

Disclaimer: We were given I amsterdam cards, entry to Nemo Science Museum and a discount on the Pancake Boat for the purposes of this review. All opinions as always, are our own.

Our full guide to getting around Amsterdam with children

Our full guide to getting around Amsterdam with children

Top tips for navigating Amsterdam with kids – car, tram, foot, bike, taxi, or ferry?

Amsterdam in Holland is a good size in many ways but for navigating with children it can be awkward.

The city isn’t huge like London or Paris where you have to get public transport to most areas. And it isn’t compact enough to just cover on foot with little ones.

Trams

We found the quickest and simplest way around was to catch the trams. You can buy an hourly or daily ticket. A child’s daily ticket costs 4 euros. If you have an I amsterdam card, travel is included but only on GVB transport (that is every bus or tram which is blue and white).

The trams are a fun option for children as you don’t see them that often in the UK. They were almost always on time and clean when we visited, however there isn’t much ventilation so they get a bit stuffy in hot weather.

Walking

If you do end up walking and you will do for some journeys, watch out for the cyclists.

I know it is an Amsterdam cliche but bikes are literally everywhere and the cycle lanes are between the road and the pavement.

It is easy to forget about the bikes when you cross the street, when already looking out for trams, cars and other vehicles. Plus they don’t seem to often stop for red lights.

Car

Even the most confident of drivers avoids driving in Amsterdam. The roads are confusing and hectic and parking is scarce and really expensive (around 5 euros an hour). So it’s lucky that Amsterdam has such good public transport.

We had our car with us as we had travelled to the Netherlands by ferry (review here), so used a park and ride to get into the city. These are a bargain in comparison. Read our 10-steps to using Amsterdam’s park and ride system for more information.

Cycling

Bicycles parked in Amsterdam

Dutch cyclists are very, very confident and quick and really know what they are doing and where they are going.

The pace is full-on, it is definitely NOT the place for youngsters to be practising their skills, so make sure children are really, really competent if this is how you plan to get around.

Or get them to sit on your bike. We saw children riding in seats in front of the adult cyclists, not behind like is common in the UK. There are also cute bike  trailers or cargo bikes (where a large container is attached at the front of the bike for the children to sit/play in).

More cycling in Amsterdam tips:

*There are lots of places to hire bicycles in Amsterdam.

*Cross tram lines diagonally else you could get your wheel stuck.

*Remember to stay to the right and most cycle paths are one-way

*Helmets are not required by law (I didn’t see a single one), but that doesn’t mean you can’t wear one.

Taxis and Uber

You can’t just hail a taxi in Amsterdam, there are specific taxi ranks or you have to call to order them. We tried an Uber (the popular taxi app) for one journey and the vehicle arrived immediately. Just remember that they probably won’t have children’s car seats or booster seat and fares can be unpredictable. The main city centre has priority given to cyclists and pedestrians over cars so what on the map can look like short taxi journeys may take quite a long time (and therefore cost more).

Ferry

You can get free ferries across the River IJ. They are blue and white and can mostly be caught behind Amsterdam Central Station. See here for routes and schedules.

We caught the free NDSM ferry from the far left hand side of the station which took us to a Pancake Boat cruise but the short 20-minute return journey would be fine for some free sightseeing from the river.

*Now find out what to do in Amsterdam with kids with our guide: Amsterdam’s top attractions and activities for children

*Read the review of our stay in Amsterdam here: Is Amsterdam child-friendly? We take a family trip to the beautiful capital of the Netherlands to find out

*Read about our journey to Amsterdam via mini-cruise: We review a mini-cruise from Newcastle to Amsterdam with DFDS ferry operator

RELATED CONTENT: Amsterdam’s park and ride service – all you need to know

RELATED CONTENT: We review Efteling – the biggest theme park in the Netherlands – and give our top tips for visiting

RELATED CONTENT: Deserts, fairytales and glamping – a family trip to Efteling and the Brabant region of Holland.

Amsterdam’s park and ride service – all you need to know

Amsterdam’s park and ride service – all you need to know

Beat the hefty parking fees and hectic streets of Amsterdam with our 10 steps to the park and ride system

We travelled to Amsterdam with our car, via ferry (full review here).

Handy? Well, yes, especially for the next part of our journey. But drivers are warned to avoid taking cars into Amsterdam city centre itself. It is difficult for tourists to navigate, has a high volume of trams and bicycles, scant parking spaces and hefty parking fees.

Thankfully, there are park and ride (P+R) options – seven good value car parks on the edge of the city.

Follow our 10-step guide to using them.

Step 1

Find a park and ride site, they are marked from the motorways. The biggest and most popular is Olympic Stadium. The junction signs will tell you if the P+R is full (Vol means full in Dutch, Vrij mean free).
You can’t book in advance.

Step 2

Enter the car park and take a normal ticket.

Step 3

Park up and find one of the blue park and ride machines. Buy the number of transport tickets you need (one per person – each ticket costs around 2/3 euros).

Step 4

Find public transport into the city centre straight away. You only have an hour after parking to reach the city centre.

IMPORTANT – You can only use the blue and white GVB trams or buses.

Tickets are not valid on other options like the metro or red buses.

Step 5

When you enter the tram/bus you MUST tap your ticket (everybody’s tickets) on the small, black, circular machine next to the door.

Step 6

Ride to your city centre stop and when you exit you MUST tap the card on the exit to register it.

Step 7

Put that card away for the remainder of your Amsterdam visit. It is useless until your return journey to park and ride – but don’t lose it!

Step 8

When leaving the city to get your car, repeat the process – tap in with your original blue card when boarding and then tap out when you arrive to collect your car.

Step 9

Return to the special park and ride machine in the car park.

Put your car park ticket in first. A huge price comes up. Don’t panic.

Step 10

Then scan your blue transport card and if you have followed the steps above your fee goes down to potentially as low as 1 euro per day.

In conclusion

This is the cheapest way to take a car to Amsterdam but it is fiddly and complicated so take care to follow these steps and you will save possibly hundreds of euros to spend on your holiday.

Read about how to navigate Amsterdam with kids here: Our full guide to getting around Amsterdam with children

And here are our tips on what to do with children in the city: Amsterdam’s top attractions and activities for children

Our full review of a family holiday to Amsterdam is here: Is Amsterdam child-friendly? We take a family trip to the beautiful capital of the Netherlands to find out

We travelled to Amsterdam by mini-cruise/ferry: We review a mini-cruise from Newcastle to Amsterdam with DFDS ferry operator

RELATED CONTENT: We review Efteling – the biggest theme park in the Netherlands – and give our top tips for visiting

RELATED CONTENT: We review a mini-cruise from Newcastle to Amsterdam with DFDS ferry operator

We review a hotel in central Amsterdam for a family holiday with children

We review a hotel in central Amsterdam for a family holiday with children

We review a stay at NH Amsterdam Centre in Holland/The Netherlands

Where is it?

NH Amsterdam Centre is a well-positioned hotel right next to Leidseplein square in Amsterdam. It is across the road from canal cruises, within five minutes’ walk of Vondelpark, Rijksmuseum and the Van Gogh Museum.

What is it?

A six-floor hotel featuring cafe and restaurant, gym and sauna.

Is it family friendly?

Fairly – standard rooms don’t accommodate more than two people so you will have to book a suite or superior room.

Breakfast was of a high standard but is adult-orientated – eg cereal options were cornflakes or six different types of muesli. But our children were welcomed with activity book and crayons.

The televisions in the rooms have a good choice of English language channels including some children’s programmes.

The rooms

Tasteful and modern decor with a light wooden floor, the rooms are welcoming. We thought the beds were very comfortable and a good size.

Bathrooms vary, we tried a superior room with a bath and overhead shower and then a suite (which was a great size), which just had a large shower.

A suite at NH Amsterdam Centre hotel

A suite

There were good size flat screen televisions (two in the suite)! Plus tea and coffee facilities and a small fridge/mini-bar.

A suite at NH Amsterdam Central hotel with two tvs

The suite had two televisions

Food and drink

Breakfast has a high-quality selection of food. As noted above, it isn’t geared particularly towards children but the food was excellent with eggs made to order, fruit, cooked options and pastries.

Breakfast at NH Amsterdam Centre in Amsterdam

For lunch and dinner, the Copper Pot restaurant does not offer a separate children’s menu but they happily catered for our two.

The restaurant is at the front of the hotel, with modern decor looking out onto the road, park and canal opposite.

We all really enjoyed our dinner there and it was nice to finish the day close to bed for our children after a busy day exploring Amsterdam.

Nearby

The location is great. Next to the busy Leidseplein, it is walking distance from three major attractions – Vondelpark, Rijksmuseum and Van Gogh Museum.

There is a tram stop across the road with a frequent service into the heart of Amsterdam (Centraal Station is about a 15-minute ride on the tram). In addition, you can take lovely canal strolls just outside the door and catch several canal cruises (we took the Blue Boat company family cruise from just down the road from the hotel, see our review here). There are also plenty of places to eat around Leidseplein.

Our highlights

Location – far enough into the city to be near major attractions but well away from the seedier side of Amsterdam. The hotel is in a great spot for exploring.

Breakfast – a high quality selection of food in a nice dining area. The scrambled eggs were particularly good. The pastries were fresh and there was lots of choice – plus the colouring packs kept the children entertained.

Beds – comfortable and clean in bright and modern rooms.

Value – when we booked it was a great price for peak season, for the standard of hotel.

Address: NH Amsterdam Centre, Stadhouderskade, 7, Amsterdam, 1054ES, Netherlands.

Read about our holiday in Amsterdam here: Is Amsterdam child-friendly? We take a family trip to the beautiful capital of the Netherlands to find out

RELATED CONTENT: Amsterdam’s top attractions and activities for children

RELATED CONTENT: Our full guide to getting around Amsterdam with children

RELATED CONTENT: Amsterdam’s park and ride service – all you need to know

RELATED CONTENT: We review Efteling – the biggest theme park in the Netherlands – and give our top tips for visiting

Our visit to the Netherlands was in two parts, read about our second adventure here: Deserts, fairytales and glamping – a family trip to Efteling and the Brabant region of Holland.

A holiday park in Holland next to the ‘Dutch desert’ – we review Duinhoeve and give our top tips for a family holiday there with children

A holiday park in Holland next to the ‘Dutch desert’ – we review Duinhoeve and give our top tips for a family holiday there with children

We go glamping in style with our children at Holidaypark Duinhoeve in the Netherlands

What is it?

Holidaypark Duinhoeve (Recreatiepark Duinhoeve) is a relaxing and peaceful holiday park with chalets, lodges, holiday homes, glamping lodges, tents and camping options.

It has playgrounds/play areas, swimming pools and a café. There is children’s entertainment at peak times.

Watch our video of Duinhoeve here and read our full review and tips below.

Where is it?

It is in the middle of Holland, an hour south of Amsterdam, in north Brabant near Udenhout, a short walk from Loonse en Drunese Dunes and a 10-minute drive to Efteling Theme Park Resort.

Is it family-friendly?

Yes, this is a good holiday park for families with younger children especially.

Our accommodation.

We stayed in a seven-person glamping lodge. It was fabulous – crafted with beautiful wooden frames and interior, all covered with canvas.

Our glamping lodge at Duinhoeve holiday park in Holland/The Netherlands

Our glamping lodge at Duinhoeve

A big 48 square metres, it has an open-plan kitchen-diner and lounge area with an L-shaped sofa and tv. The kitchen has a hob, microwave combi oven, fridge, freezer, kettle and coffee maker, along with plates, bowls, cutlery and utensils.

Glamping lodge living area/lounge at Duinhoeve holiday park in Holland/The Netherlands

The first bedroom has a double bed, the second has bunk beds and a single bed. Then there is a bedstead – a separate space up a ladder, filled with a double mattress.

Three-person bedroom at a glamping lodge at Duinhoeve Holiday Park in Holland

There is one bathroom with a big double shower (no bath).

The children were really happy with the lodge – there is even an extra little space which little ones can use as a small den or play room, with a little doorway – or it would make a fabulous storage area.

And there is a large undercover decking/veranda area outside at the front with a big picnic bench and separate garden furniture sofas.

Glamping lodge kitchen diner at Duinhoeve holiday park in Holland/The Netherlands

We loved staying in this glamping lodge, it felt almost new and very clean.

Food and drink

We bought supplies from a local supermarket, plus a few bits from home and mainly ate at the accommodation or made picnics.

But there is a restaurant on site with outdoor and indoor seating area.

Restaurant cafe at Duinhoeve holiday park in Holland/The Netherlands

On-site restaurant

Plus there is a restaurant called Landgoed Bosch en Duin, with a play area, a five-minute walk away where we stopped off one day for Dutch specialities poffertjes (small round Dutch pancakes) and apple pie.

Nearby

*It is a five-minute walk from the site through woodland to stunning sand dunes – our children felt like we were in a desert.

the Dunes of Loon in Drunen National Park

Dunes of Loon

In fact, the Dunes of Loon in Drunen National Park, which formed 10,000 years ago, is sometimes called the Dutch Desert or Brabant Sahara. It is the largest sand drift area in western Europe.

*It is a 10-minute drive to Efteling – Holland’s biggest theme park, read our review of it here and watch our video below.

*The medieval city of Den Bosch is 25 minutes away.

The cathedral city of Den Bosch

Den Bosch

It has a cathedral, museums, lots of shops and cafes, we sampled the city’s speciality – Bossche Bollen – a Danish pastry reminiscent of a huge round chocolate éclair or profiterole but much nicer.

Bosche Bollen, yum

*Beekse Bergen Safari Park is half an hour away by car.

Our highlights

*This holiday park has three play areas including a nice playground near to our glamping lodge and one next to the swimming pools, with a giant bouncing pillow trampoline.

A play area at Duinhoeve Holiday Park in Holland

*The swimming pools

The main pool is solar heated and 1.4m deep throughout. It is on the small side but we all enjoyed it – it was a great temperature, not too cold and we were all glad of it as temperatures reached 33 degrees during our stay.

toddler pool at Duinhoeve Holiday Park in Holland

The small children’s pool is shallow and has a pirate ship with two slides – perfect for toddlers and little ones.

*The surrounding area

Being next to the Dunes of Doon desert was a great bonus plus there are some good walks and cycle routes.

*Accommodation

The fabulous glamping lodge we stayed in felt roomy and fresh and the children loved it.

More information

*Dogs are allowed if you are camping, they are not allowed in any of the rental accommodation options apart from rental tents upon request.

Address: Oude Bosschebaan 4,5071 RR Udenhout

For more information or to book click here.

Read the full review of our trip here: Deserts, fairytales and glamping – a family trip to Efteling and the Brabant region of Holland.

We travelled to Holland by mini-cruise from England, read our review and top tips here: We review a mini-cruise from Newcastle to Amsterdam with DFDS ferry operator

The first part of our rip was in Amsterdam, read about it here: Is Amsterdam child-friendly? We take a family trip to the beautiful capital of the Netherlands to find out

RELATED CONTENT: Amsterdam’s top attractions and activities for children

RELATED CONTENT: Our full guide to getting around Amsterdam with children

RELATED CONTENT: Amsterdam’s park and ride service – all you need to know

RELATED CONTENT: We review Efteling – the biggest theme park in the Netherlands – and give our top tips for visiting

*Disclaimer – we were guests of Duinhoeve Holidaypark for the purposes of this review. All views are our own.

Duinrell holiday and amusement park in Holland gives triple the fun for children on a family holiday

Duinrell holiday and amusement park in Holland gives triple the fun for children on a family holiday

We review Duinrell in the Netherlands to find out if a theme park, water park and beach makes for a perfect family holiday

Forget double Dutch. We have discovered a triple treat in Holland – a holiday heaven for children which combines a theme park, water park and beach.

I’m sure we never would have stumbled across this gem without a recommendation from a friend whose family return year after year.

Duinrell holiday and amusement park is in the upmarket town of Wassenaar, 25 miles from Amsterdam, on the south-west coast – where the Dutch royal family spend some of their time.

The tranquil setting of the accommodation, between woodland and sand dunes, is in contrast with the high octane excitement of its theme and water parks.

Duingalows

There are a choice of chalets, called Duingalows, as well as various camping options.

Two children stand in front of their Duingalow at Duinrell in Holland.

A Duingalow at Duinrell in Holland.

Our newly-built lodge was modern and fully equipped. It had three bedrooms, a kitchen with dishwasher, open-plan lounge/dining area and a secluded terrace, from which to enjoy the leafy surroundings.

If you aren’t cooking then there are several restaurants and takeaway options on site and in the nearby town.

Our two were thrilled to use their scooters to explore but a lot of families were on bikes, which can be hired along with electric bikes and go-karts.

Theme park

First we headed to the amazing theme park.

One of the rides at Duinrell theme park in Holland.

The theme park at Duinrell in Holland

Adrenaline lovers and children aged eight to 18 would get the most out of all the roller coasters and other rides.

Our two are younger but found plenty to do too and as we stayed during the week at half-term, there were lots of English people but no long queues. It was noticeably busier on the Friday when we left.

Water park

Secondly, if you’re after more thrills and spills, the park has a fantastic indoor water park called Tikibad with enough slides and waves to keep everyone happy.

Some of the water slides at Tikibad water park at Duinrell in Holland.

With our accommodation, we had free entry to both the water park and the theme park.

Beach

And finally, the big, sandy Wassenaar beach is just two miles away.

Two children on Wassenaar beach near Duinrell in Holland/The Netherlands

Wassenaar beach.

There are fabulous cycle lanes everywhere so we hired bikes to enjoy the safe route through vast sand dunes to enjoy time together by the sea.

Ferry

Cycling may be the way to get around in the Netherlands but the cheapest way we found for us to get to Duinrell was by car and ferry.

We used the DFDS ferry from Dover to Dunkirk. It was a bank holiday and long delays at Dover passport control meant we boarded with just three minutes to spare.

The children loved exploring the spacious ship and restaurants and the one hour 50 minute crossing passed quickly.

From Dunkirk, it was three more hours in the car, on increasingly flat terrain dotted with wind turbines.

Surrounding area

With its woodland walks and sand dune scrambles around Duinrell, as well as the popular Luciano ice cream parlour in Wassenaar, you don’t need to leave the area.

But we took a trip to the university city of Leiden. It had charming canals, cobbled streets and waterside markets where we sampled Dutch pancakes called poffertjes.

In conclusion

Holland might not be the first place that springs to mind for a summer holiday but you needn’t think twice about trying a trip to Duinrell with its trio of family attractions.

Accommodation: We stayed as guests at Duinrell holiday and amusement park in Wassenaar, Holland for the purposes of this review. All opinions are our own.

Travel: We travelled by car and via ferry from Dover to Dunkirk, courtesy of DFDS.

RELATED CONTENT: Five reasons to take a family holiday to South Holland

Five reasons to take a family holiday to South Holland

Five reasons to take a family holiday to South Holland

The best towns, beaches and attractions in the southern Netherlands for families

Wassenaar – the Dutch Windsor

This small town is one of the wealthiest in Holland and it shows in the shops and restaurants.

There are lots of places to eat, a lovely atmosphere and quiet cyclefriendly roads as you would expect. There is also a great beach.

Leiden and its canals

Leiden has an excellent park and ride service on the edge of the city.

boats on a canal in Leiden in the Netherlands

Leiden and its canals are well worth exploring

You park and catch a free minibus which drops you in the city centre and then call them to pick you up when you’re finished.

The city has a lovely canalside market with Dutch poffertjes (a Dutch batter treat like a baby pancake) on sale, which are a hit with children. There is a small fort you can climb for views over the city.

Cycle-friendly

Yes, Holland is famous for being a bicycle rider’s paradise but it isn’t until you use the system you realise how good it is.

a couple ride a tandem bike in Holland

Cylcing is safe and fun in South Holland

There are special lanes a good distance away from the road – the sort of thing which rarely exists in the UK.

The beaches

If you ignore the wind and the chilly north sea, the sand on the Dutch beaches is a match for anywhere in Europe.

The beach at Wassenaar is golden and perfect for sandcastles and games.

There are plenty of amenities too, restaurants and cafes, toilets and loads of space to park a car or a bike. In good weather it’s a great spot.

Two children on Wassenaar beach

Wassenaar beach is a match for any in Europe and

Ice cream

Luciano’s famous ice cream parlour in Wassenaar is very popular.

It is at the end of the main street, has been in the town since 1996 and has dozens of flavours to choose from.

There’s nice seating outside or take your ice cream and stroll through the town.

RELATED CONTENT: Duinrell holiday and amusement park in Holland gives triple the fun for children on a family holiday

What have we missed? Tell us what you like best.