COMMENTS

Our first boating holiday takes in the famous Pontyscyllte Aqueduct on the Llangollen Canal

I have been in charge of an 18-tonne canal boat the length of a lorry for roughly a minute.

Concentrating hard, I navigate on to the Pontyscyllte Aqueduct, the width of our craft Askrigg, trying to ignore the 40-metre sheer drop on one side into the River Dee.

The expert, who has just given us an hour’s worth of thorough instructions, steps off the barge and we are alone crossing the longest aqueduct in Britain and the highest in the world.

As introductions to canal life goes, there’s nothing like being thrown in at the deep end as our two children enjoy the ride and my husband helps direct from the front – almost 70 feet away.

We are on a Drifters waterways holiday and our Anglo Welsh boat has just left Trevor basin near Llangollen in north east Wales.

About to depart in a narrowboat from Trevor basin

About to depart from Trevor basin

Our four-day route is along the Llangollen Canal with overnight stops at the border village of Chirk and the Shropshire town of Ellesmere.

I quickly discover that canal boating is simultaneously very relaxing and stressful. Once we cross the aqueduct with its amazing views, there are other boats to dodge, tight turns to master and long tunnels to chug through.

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There’s even a swing bridge to lift and our six-year-old gets out, armed with the windlass (the tool to lift canal locks and bridges) and starts helping turn the gauge to raise it high above the canal and allow us to pass through.

Children can help lift swing bridges on the canal

At first, bridges and locks may be daunting but they quickly become part of the fun, giving the children some activity and making them feel part of the team.

Luckily, every boater seems friendly and happy to help if you get in a fix.

Helming takes some practice, the boat is steered from the rear with a tiller. You may find yourself gently bumping the sides, glancing off low bridges or getting stuck in shallow water.

Coming out from a tunnel on the Llangollen Canal

Coming out from a tunnel

It is all part of the adventure and steering quickly becomes second nature, even if you can never entirely relax at the helm.

We take it in turns so one of us can be with the children, prepare food or even relax, lazing at the front, enjoying the scenery.

There’s something pretty awesome about travelling along in a floating home but I recommend mooring up as often as possible to explore the towpath and surroundings.

A family travels on a canal boat

We love stopping where we want, discovering walks through the countryside with just cows for company. This slow pace of travel needs to be embraced.

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We also make planned stops at Chirk near to the famous castle, Ellesmere with its mere, playground, sculpture trail and quaint town centre, the small village of St Martin’s and also the base at Trevor, from where you can cross the famous aqueduct, a world heritage site, on foot.

As your confidence dealing with the boat increases, so does your speed carrying out its regular checks, filling with water and tying the ropes.

And the quality of our craft Askrigg really helps make the holiday (read our detailed review of the boat). It is one of Anglo Welsh’s Bond class boats and sleeps up to six (read our full review of it here).

A girl sits in the lounge of the bond boat Askrigg from Anglo Welsh

Inside our boat Askrigg

There is lots of space inside, two bedrooms, two bathrooms with showers, a well-equipped kitchen, lounge/dining area, television, radio, central heating and WiFi. It is also extremely clean and Covid compliant.

By the end of our mini-break it has become a home from home so as we head back over the aqueduct four days later, the view was just as stunning but any novice nerves about taking a canal boat holiday have disappeared.

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Drifters’ 2020 Fact Box

Drifters Waterway Holidays offers 550 canal boats for hire from 45 bases across England, Scotland and Wales.

There are over 3,000 miles of waterways for you to discover, all at your own pace and you don’t need to be an expert. Tuition is included as part of Drifters’ holiday packages.

Drifters’ 2020 hire prices for a boat for up to four people start at £530 for a short break (three or four nights), rising to £855 in the peak summer holidays.

A boat for up to four for a week starts at £915, rising to £1220 in the peak of the summer holidays.

Narrowboats range from 32ft to 70ft and can accommodate from two up to 12 people.

For more information visit the website or call 0344 984 0322.

More information about visiting the canal network is available from the Canal River Trust.

*We received a complimentary break for the purposes of this review. All views are our own.

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