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Children can meet Santa live from Lapland over video call this Christmas

Children can meet Santa live from Lapland over video call this Christmas

It’s a Digital Christmas 2020 with the new Santa’s Lapland video call experience

Taking your children to meet Santa may not be possible this year due to lockdown restrictions.

So holiday company Santa’s Lapland is bringing Father Christmas into children’s homes using the magic of video calls.

It will give families a taste of the festive excitement that comes from meeting Santa.

The new scheme follows the announcement that the company has had to suspend their December 2020 trips to Lapland.

The 10-minute video call will prove its Lapland credentials, as an Elf leads the family through the snow and gets up-close with a reindeer, before going live to Santa’s cabin for a personalised meeting with Santa himself.

Paul Carter, CEO of Santa’s Lapland, said: “With restrictions increasing throughout the UK, many of us have been wondering how we will keep the magic of Christmas 2020 alive.

“We intend to help make it one to remember, by offering families the chance to meet Santa from the comfort and safety of their own home.

“While no Christmas can compare to the sheer excitement of travelling to Lapland to visit Santa in his snowy cabin, where the reindeer are real and the Northern Lights dance across the night sky, families will now still be able to enjoy a taste of the real Lapland magic this Christmas.”

Santa Live video calls from Lapland

Santa Live video calls from Lapland

A personalised ‘Santa, Live from Lapland’ video call experience for up to four children costs from £85 per family from Santa Live.

The company cancelled its December 2020 trips to visit Santa in Lapland following concerns that increasing COVID-19 safety measures and travel restrictions would take too much away from the magic of the experience.

Many customers have postponed their trip to next year and others have taken refunds.

Santa’s Lapland three and four-night trips for 2021 are available to reserve now with departures from November 26 to December 24 from 13 regional airports.

The breaks include snow fun, husky sledding and reindeer sleigh rides, a search for Santa and other activities.

For more information, visit www.santaslapland.com

Opening date revealed for one of the world’s biggest LEGOLAND parks

Opening date revealed for one of the world’s biggest LEGOLAND parks

Work starts next year on one of the biggest LEGOLAND resorts in the world

Work to build LEGOLAND Shanghai is set to start in 2021, Merlin Entertainments has announced.

The huge new park is expected to open in China in 2024 and will incude a 250-room themed hotel.

LEGOLAND Shanghai will be opened after LEGOLAND New York – scheduled for 2021 – and LEGOLAND Korea – scheduled for 2022.

The theme park will be located in the Jinshan District and will draw inspiration from the area.

Other businesses are expected to launch in the vicinity as a result, including hotels, retail, sports facilities, offices and high-end housing.

Merlin is investing a lot in China – it has opened the world’s first Peppa Pig World of Play (Shanghai) and Little BIG City (Beijing).

Merlin Entertainments chief Executive Nick Varney said: “I am delighted to work with our partners to bring one of the world’s largest LEGOLAND Resorts to Shanghai, which builds on the other attractions we have developed in this exciting part of the country.

“The Shanghai LEGOLAND Resort will be a must-visit destination for playful learning experiences for the millions of people who live in the vicinity and beyond.

“The Merlin team looks forward to working with our partners to develop the creative concept design for the resort and making it a reality, marking a significant milestone for Merlin’s presence in the Chinese market.”

Merlin Entertainments announced this week that it has entered into a formal co-operation agreement with the Shanghai Jinshan District Government, CMC Inc. and KIRKBI to develop the resort.

This follows the signing of a framework agreement in November 2019.

A joint venture company is being formed to contribute funding to the construction and development of LEGOLAND Shanghai.

The total project investment is expected to be approximately $550 million.

Tickets go on sale for Santa holidays to Lapland for Christmas 2021

Tickets go on sale for Santa holidays to Lapland for Christmas 2021

Families can look forward to a festive treat for 2021 with a visit to Santa in Lapland

This Christmas may end up being low key but families can already get ready for a fantastic festive 2021 with a Santa holiday to Lapland.

Santa’s Lapland and Inghams Santa Breaks have launched their Christmas dates for next year.

A family reindeer ride

The snowy breaks include husky sledding and reindeer sleigh rides, enchanted activities and a visit to the ‘real’ Santa at his home.

Huskies in Lapland

Families can choose from two breaks – Santa’s Magic with a selection of hotels or Santa’s Aurora where you stay at the Star Arctic hotel, great for those who want to spot the Northern Lights.

Star Arctic Hotel in Lapland

Star Arctic Hotel

Both are available as three or four night holidays with flights from 14 regional airports.

At the time of writing, 2020 holidays to Lapland could still be booked as well.

A spokesperson said: “Santa’s Lapland and Inghams Santa Breaks are paying constant attention to the guidance from the UK’s FCDO, ABTA, Public Health England and local health authorities in Finland.

“Following recent updates, they’re working closely with their partners in Lapland to see what these decisions mean for their Lapland holidays. The Lapland holidays are currently expected to go ahead as planned.”

For more information or to book a break visit Santa’s Lapland.

READ MORE: Children can meet Santa live from Lapland over video call this Christmas

A child meets reindeers in Lapland

Illuminated trails light up famous sites around the UK for families this Christmas 2020

Illuminated trails light up famous sites around the UK for families this Christmas 2020

Christmas fun for all the family at seven light installations around the country

Tickets are on sale for fantastic festive trails at seven famous sites across the country.

World-renowned artists and designers have got together to create the illuminated events at historic and iconic venues including Kew Gardens, Blenheim Palace and Dunham Massey.

The outdoor experiences are designed for all ages to enjoy and celebrate the festive season.

Additional facilities and significantly increased hygiene procedures will be made available for trail visitors.

The events have been organised by promoter Raymond Gubbay Limited, Culture Creative and the individual venues.

Christmas at Kew

When: November 18, 2020 to January 3, 2021

What: Now in its eighth year, Christmas at Kew returns with a new trail to illuminate the fabulous gardens with more than one million lights.

Address: Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, London, TW9 3AE.

More details: kew.org/christmas #christmasatkew

Christmas at Bedgebury

Christmas at Bedgebury

Christmas at Bedgebury

When: November 20 to December 31, 2020.

What: This family-friendly one-mile magical festive trail is in the heart of the High Weald Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty countryside.

Address: Bedgebury National Pinetum & Forest, Kent.

More details: christmasatbedgebury.co.uk   #christmasatbedgebury

Christmas at Blenheim Palace

Christmas at Blenheim Palace

Christmas at Blenheim Palace

When: November 20, 2020 to January 3, 2021.

What: The Illuminated trail returns to Blenheim Palace transforming it with a bright and magical winter walk inspired by the landscape itself, featuring lasers and light projections.

Address: Blenheim Palace, Woodstock, Oxfordshire, OX20 1PP.

More details: blenheimpalace.com/christmas  #christmasatblenheimpalace

Christmas at Dunham Massey

Christmas at Dunham Massey

Christmas at Dunham Massey

When: November 20 to December 30, 2020.

What: The sell-out trail returns for a fourth year to this historic National Trust property in Cheshire.

See our review and guide from last year’s exravaganza Dunham Massey Christmas Lights 2019 plus exclusive video.

Address: Dunham Massey, Altrincham, Cheshire. WA14 4SJ.

More details: nationaltrust.org.uk/dunham-massey #christmasatdunhammassey

Christmas at The Botanics

When: November 26, 2020 to January 3, 2021.

What: The new trail at the Royal Botanic Garden in Edinburgh will feature bouncing lines of light in the laser garden and giant luminescent sculptures rising high into the night sky.

Inverleith House will be it by a new festive projection across its historic façade.

Address: Royal Botanic Garden, Edinburgh, EH3 5NZ.

More details: rbge.org.uk/christmas  #christmasatthebotanics

Christmas at Belton

When: November 27, 2020 to January 3, 2021.

What: Christmas at Belton will once again light up the historic tree canopies of this magnificent country-house estate.

There will be giant luminescent candles, glowing flowers and snowflakes, plus children can look out for Father Christmas.

Address: Belton House, Grantham, Lincolnshire, NG32 2LS.

More details: nationaltrust.org.uk/belton-house #christmasatbelton

Christmas at Stourhead

Christmas at Stourhead

Christmas at Stourhead

When: November 27, 2020 to January 3, 2021

What: The after-dark trail lights up the beautiful National Trust gardens at Stourhead, Wiltshire for a second year.

Address: Stourhead, Mere, Wiltshire, BA12 6QD.

More details: nationaltrust.org.uk/Stourhead  #christmasatstourhead

For more details on the trails or to book tickets, go to mychristmastrails.co.uk

Lightopia 2020: Spectacular lantern and light festival returns to Manchester

Lightopia 2020: Spectacular lantern and light festival returns to Manchester

Family fun awaits at award-winning Christmas light festival

While many Christmas events are being cancelled, an award-winning and socially-distanced light festival in Manchester is set to go ahead.

Lightopia returns to the city with this year’s Christmas at Heaton Park event.

The festive family festival runs from November 20, 2020 to January 3, 2021.

There will be new themes and creations but changes have also been made in light of Covid restrictions, to keep visitors safe including wider footpaths and three entry points to reduce queueing.

There will be a magical illuminated trail, designed so that people can maintain a social distance from each other and two car parks.

Lightopia 2020 will also pay tribute to Coronavirus frontline workers with a Local Heroes Area, featuring the words ‘thank you’ and a colourful rainbow display.

Lightopia creative director Ian Xiang said organisers are “excited” to bring Lightopia back to Manchester.

“We have once again created a world in which light, sculpture and art combine with traditional, Chinese lantern-making techniques to create an immersive experience, full of light and stories,” he said.

“We want our guests to become part of the Lightopia story, helping to create new forms of art as they interact and engage with the luminescent sculptures that trail through Heaton Park.”

Lightopia 2020 Christmas at Heaton Park, Manchester

Lightopia

Among the new additions will be a Christmas showcase using the Grade I-listed Heaton Hall as its sparkling backdrop.

There will also be Santa’s sleigh, a giant interactive walking piano, an astronomy display and interactive Zodiac sign installation.

Children will love robotic controlled pads on the floor, which create light shows when stepped on.

Another area is dedicated to the Manchester skyline and an immersive Musical City area, will encourage visitors to dance their way through the lights.

Returning attractions include the Woodland Fairytale area, the Animals attraction and the Discovery space.

Lightopia 2020 Christmas at Heaton Park, Manchester

A Lakeside water show includes a state-of-the-art projection while dragon sculptures will lead the way to Lightopia’s food stalls and licensed bars.

The event from November 20 to January 3 runs between 5pm and 10pm and last entry is 8.30pm daily.

The event is closed on Mondays and Tuesdays, except during school holidays and closed on Christmas Eve and Christmas Day.

Tickets are £20 online for adults (or £22 on the day), £13 for children (or £15 on the day) and £60 for families of two adults and two children (£68 on the day). Children under three can go free.

Essential carers of disabled visitors can attend for free, the disabled visitor pays the normal admission fee.

To book tickets, visit www.lightopiafestival.com

Follow on Instagram and Facebook @lightopiafestival #Lightopia

The 8 BEST beaches in and around Abersoch in north Wales

The 8 BEST beaches in and around Abersoch in north Wales

The best beaches for children and families around Abersoch on the Llŷn Peninsula

Families staying in Abersoch on the Llŷn Peninsula are spoilt for choice when it comes to fabulous beaches.

It’s one of the reasons that people with children return to the area year after year.

Our two children adore the beaches around the area – here are our favourites.

Abersoch main beach

The main beach in Abersoch is the busiest, easiest to reach and most user-friendly in the area.

Barbecue on Abersoch Main Beach

Beach hut barbecue on Abersoch’s main beach

It stretches about a mile and a half with plenty of golden sand, a steep hill up to beach huts and sand dunes to explore.

At the far left end (if facing the sea), near the South Caernarvonshire Yacht Club/SCYC, there are some rock pools at low tide.

At the other end of the beach towards the lifeboat station, there is less soft sand but it tends to be quieter and dogs are allowed.

The beach is sheltered and safe for swimming under normal conditions, with a motor boat exclusion zone. It is also popular for water sports like sailing and wind surfing.

There are great views – it faces St Tudwal’s islands and behind that, west Wales mountans.

Where is it?

The beach is a short walk from the centre of Abersoch and and can be accessed from two car parks detailed below.

Parking

*The main car park is Beach Car Park, Golf Road, Abersoch. You have to pay to park all year round. A very short walk brings you past a shop/cafe and out on to the slipway in the middle of the beach.

There is another, smaller, pay car park at the SCYC (yacht club) end of the beach and there is also a cafe there. Access to the beach is via a short, steep slope.

Abersoch main beach facilities

*Three cafes along the beach serving ice creams, sandwiches and burgers plus beach equipment.

*Toilets in the main car park.

*Some of the beach huts are available to hire.

Dogs

*Dogs are allowed on the right side of the slipway all year and the rest of the beach except between April 1 and September 30.

The Warren beach

This long sandy beach is mostly used by people with chalets at the upmarket Warren Holiday Park.

 

The Warren Beach in Abersoch

The Warren Beach

However it is still a public beach and one of our favourites. It’s a good beach for bathing and there are several streams to play in.

You can also explore the rocks around Llandbedrog Head. The wide expanse of wet sand at low tide means plenty of space.

It’s usually pretty quiet as it can be harder to access unless you are staying at the Warren.

Where is it?

This one and a half mile long beach is in front of the Warren Holiday Park and stretches from Abersoch harbour to the headland of Mynydd Tir-y-Cwmwd.

The Abersoch end is known as Traeth Tywyn y Fach while the headland side is called Quarry Beach.

Parking

*Abersoch end: Park along the A499, then walk through the National Trust’s Tywyn y Fach property.

*Quarry Beach end: There is a car park behind the beach which can be reached via narrow lanes off the main Abersoch to Pwllheli road by the red postbox.

*Via The Warren holiday park: Park in a layby on the main road and walk through the holiday park along a public footpath.

The Warren beach facilities

There are no toilets apart from at the holiday park for people staying there.

There is no cafe or shop, so take supplies!

Dogs

Dogs are allowed at all times.

Hell’s Mouth (Porth Neigwl)

Porth Neigwl, better known as Hell’s Mouth, is a windswept beach which gets its name from the amount of shipwrecks which washed up here.

Hell's Mouth beach

Hell’s Mouth beach

This is the area’s premier surfing beach and often sees big waves.

The beach is mostly stony with some sandy areas and – at four miles long – has plenty of quiet spots.

Take care when swimming as there are strong currents and undertows – it is only suitable for strong swimmers.

There are low sand dunes with some World War Two concrete training structures to discover but stay away from the crusty cliff edges.

We love it for a wild and windy walk as it’s only a short drive from Abersoch.

Where is it?

It is on the south-west side of the Llŷn Peninsula in Llanengan, near Pwllheli, LL53 7LG.

Parking

There’s a free car park with about 15 spaces and then a five-minute walk down a sandy path to the beach.

Facilities

There are no toilets or catering.

Whistling Sands (Porth Oer)

Porth Oer is better known as Whistling Sands for the noise the sand makes if you step on it. A noise and an idea which children love.

Sand castles at Whistling Sands beach

Whistling Sands beach

This beautiful golden beach is a perfect size for families.

There is plenty of soft sand, a nice gentle bay for swimming and rock pools at either end to mess about in.

The beach is in one of the more remote parts of the Llŷn Peninsula and a 25 minute drive from Abersoch but is well worth it.

Explore the small caves at the right hand end of the beach, and climb up the footpath there for spectacular views (hold on to small children).

Where is it?

It is in Aberdaron, Pwllheli, LL53 8LH. (Not to be mistaken for Aberdaron Beach).

Parking

There is a National Trust car park on the road above the beach. It is a very steep three-minute walk down (and a slower walk back up)!

Facilities

*Toilets

*A cafe on the beach serving hot and cold food and drinks including pizza and ice-cream which you can eat there or take on to the beach. The pizza is delicious.

Pizza at Whistling Sands

Pizza at Whistling Sands

Wishing I was there now and eating this pizza instead of just writing about it!

Llanbedrog Beach

This beach is an easy stop-off with children as there’s a car park, toilets and a cafe.

Beach huts at Llanbedrogg Beach

Llanbedrog Beach

It’s a good place for children to swim, plus there are streams and pools to play in.

Intrepid families can walk from the beach up the steep steps to the top of Llandbedrog headland Mynydd Tir y Cwmwd, but keep hold of children.

hildren play in the stream on Llanbedrog Beach

Llanbedrog Beach

Half way up is the Tin Man sculpture.

You can also walk to Oriel Plas Glyn y Weddw art gallery and cafe.

But there’s a restaurant right on the beach plus as it’s a sheltered spot, you could try a beach barbecue.

Where is it

In Llanbedrog, between Abersoch and Pwllheli on the south side of the Llŷn Peninsula.

Parking

There is a National Trust car park a two-minute walk from the beach (up a hill and steps). Address: Llanbedrog, Pwllheli, LL53 7TT.

Facilities

*Toilets near the beach.

*Restaurant on the beach serving alcohol, hot meals and ice creams Aqua Beach Bar.

Porth Iago Beach

This small horseshoe-shaped bay is spectacular but tricky to reach.

Porth Lago Beach

Porth Lago Beach

To get there you must drive through a private farm and pay an entrance/car park fee to reach a grassy parking area.

From there you walk down narrow and steep tracks to reach the remote beach.

It is a sheltered cove with some excellent rock pools and makes a good swimming spot.

The sand is soft and there are amazing views to be had by following the Wales Coastal Path in either direction from the cliffs above the beach.

Where is it?

Port Iago beach faces south-west on the Llŷn Peninsula in Aberdaron, between the headlands Graig Ddu and Dinas.

Parking

The car park above the beach is accessed through Ty Mawr farm which has a pay and display parking machine so take some £1 coins.

Address: Rhoshirwaun, Wales, LL53 8LP, United Kingdom.

You can also reach the beach on foot from the Wales Coastal Path via sand dunes.

Facilities

None.

Dogs

Dogs are allowed but have to be in vehicles when going through the farm.

Porth Colmon Beach/Penllech Beach

This large beach is a tricky one to get to but is a rewarding find once you get there, at low tide.

Porth Colman Beach

Porth Colmon Beach

It can be muddy as the route from a car park follows a stream. Once you reach the beach, there is a steep walk down to the sand.

The beach itself is wide with dramatic rocks, lots of rock pools and in the middle there is a channel which you can paddle and play in.

There can be strong currents so swimming is not advisable.

Aerial view of Porth Colman

Porth Colmon

Where is it?

Penllech Beach is a mile north of Llangwnnadl on the northern tip of the Llŷn Peninsula.

Parking

You can park at a small car park on Afon Fawr and then follow the beach path for about 10 minutes across a field.

Facilities

None, there is a cafe at a near by campsite about a ten minute walk from one end of the beach.

Dogs

Dogs are allowed.

Morfa Nefyn Beach/Nefyn Beach (Porth Nefyn)

This is a lovely, sandy, two-mile beach but the most memorable part of it is the pub at one end, the Ty Coch.

Nefyn beach with Morfa Nefyn and a heart written in the sand

Picture available to buy as a greetings card or picture at Sand-Writing

There are a few beach huts and some great views as well as rock pools at low tide near the headland.

We like to walk from the car park down on the beach, along to the next section, Traeth Porthdinllaen, where the pub invitingly waits and then back along the road through the golf course.

Where is it?

Between the village of Nefyn and the fishing hamlet of Porthdinllaen on the north coast of the Llŷn Peninsula.

Parking

There is a National Trust car park above the beach – address Morfa Nefyn, Pwllheli , L53 6DA.

Nefyn Beach Facilities

Pub Ty Coch selling lovely food and drink, hailed amongst the best beach bars in the world!

Toilets: at the National Trust car park.

Dogs

Dogs are allowed on one side of the beach all year but are banned for the other side between April and September.

*Main picture available to buy as a canvas, print or greetings card from sand-writing.com.

The top 20 best National Trust gardens in the UK revealed

The top 20 best National Trust gardens in the UK revealed

Have you been to any of the country’s favourite National Trust Gardens?

A National Trust garden in Cheshire has been hailed the best in the UK on a list of the top 20.

Tatton Park scooped the top spot in research by Rated People, an index which uses Instagram and Google review data to work out how rated and picturesque each garden is.

The park near Knutsford has 50 acres of landscaped gardens which include a maze and a Japanese garden, plus 1,000 acres of parkland with deer and meres.

There is also a working farm and large playground. Read or full review and top tips here : Tatton Park in Cheshire with children.

Tatton Park

Tatton Park

The second best national trust garden has been named as Corfe Castle in Dorset.

We visited this castle as part of an Enid Blyton holiday.

Corfe Castle was the inspiration for Kirrin Castle in the Famous Five books, full story here: Four holiday in Dorset: Following in the footsteps of the Famous Five

Corfe Castle, the inspiration for Kirrin Castle

Corfe Castle, the inspiration for Kirrin Castle

Here are all the top 20 National Trust gardens.

1. Tatton Park, Cheshire

2. Corfe Castle, Dorset

3. Stourhead Landscape Garden, Wiltshire

4. Fountains Abbey and Studley Royal Water Garden, North Yorkshire

5. Clumber Park, Nottinghamshire

6. Lyme Park, Cheshire

7. Waddesdon Gardens, Buckinghamshire

8. Calke Gardens and Parklands, Derbyshire

9. Hardwick Gardens and Parkland, Derbyshire

10. Chartwell Garden, Kent

11. Belton, Lincolnshire

12. Scotney Castle, Kent

13. Anglesey Abbey, Cambridgeshire

14. Lacock, Wiltshire

15. Nymans, Sussex

16. Mount Stewart, County Down

17. Tyntesfield, Somerset

18. Mottisfont, Hampshire and the Isle of Wight

19. Dyrham Park, Gloucestershire

20. Bodnant Garden, Conwy

 

The eight best places for children on and around the Llangollen Canal

The eight best places for children on and around the Llangollen Canal

Top family activities around the Llangollen Canal

The Llangollen Canal is 46 miles long and crosses the border between England and Wales.

This navigable waterway runs from Llangollen in north Wales, through Ellesmere in Shropshire to Hurleston in south Cheshire.

We travelled much of it with our children: Canal boat family holiday review – we take our children on a 67-foot barge.

There was lots to keep them entertained, here are our top tips for what to do with children on a family boat trip along the canal or a holiday in the area.

Llangollen

The market town of Llangollen is a fabulous day out for children.

When travelling by canal, the part between Trevor Bason and Llangollen town is narrow and not suited to beginners.

If you don’t attempt it, it’s still worth spending time in Llangollen before you collect your boat or after you have finished your canal cruise if you are nearby.

To enjoy the town centre, join families relaxing on the rocks next to the River Dee. There are lots of flat stones to walk acroos on the river and shallow pools in between. Families often pop down there to enjoy an ice cream or fish and chips with a view.

Stepping stones in Llangollen

Llangollen

You reach the river stones via the Victorian promenade, which is a lovely walkway raised above the river. Next to it there is a large playground.

Children will also love the spectacular Horseshoe Falls, where the canal and river meet to form a weir, a couple of miles west of the town.

You can see kayakers flying down this part of the River Dee and there are pleasant walks.

Horseshoe Falls near Llangollen

Horseshoe Falls

Ellesmere

There are three meres near to this stretch of canal. You can moor up to walk around Colemere, or stop at Blakemere to admire the view.

If you moor up overnight in Ellesmere there is a walk to the town’s lake through woodland off the towpath near Blackwater Marina.

Blakemere at Ellesmere

Blakemere at Ellesmere

It is about a 10-minute walk through a lovely wood to the mere, then you can go to the visitor centre, or head clockwise around to the sculpture trail and wide-open playground.

The town itself is pleasant enough to stroll around with a few takeaways and Vermeulens Delicatessen famed for its pork pies. You can walk back to your boat along the canal next to a giant Tesco, which is handy if you need to stock up.

Llangollen Wharf

This wharf in Llangollen is part of a World Heritage site.

Welsh cream teas are served at the Wharf Tea Room, with views out over the town and canal.

You can try a horse drawn boat trip from here – they have been running from the wharf for more than 100 years. Trips are 45 minutes or two hours.

Horse drawn boats from Llangollen Wharf

Horse drawn boats from Llangollen Wharf

Llangollen Steam railway

This heritage railway line starts at Llangollen Station and runs alongside the River Dee, travelling through the picturesque Dee Valley.

It has events for families throughout the year such as meeting Thomas the Tank Engine.

Passengers can enjoy afternoon tea on a Llangollen Steam railway train.

Chirk Castle

This huge National Trust castle with 480 acres of parkland is a popular attraction.

If you arrive by canal, it is a long walk but if you have bicycles it is manageable. If you make it you will discover one of Edward I’s castles.

You might catch a demonstration of the guard’s armour and weapons.

Pontcysyllte Aqueduct

You can cross the Pontcysyllte Aqueduct by narrowboat or on foot – it’s the highest navigable aqueduct in the world.

Pontcysyllte Aqueduct

Pontcysyllte Aqueduct

It takes the Llangollen Canal over the River Dee valley and has fantastic views as long as you don’t have a fear of heights as it’s nearly 40 metres high!

Completed in 1805, it was designed and built by Thomas Telford and has 19 arches.

The aqueduct, which has World Heritage status, is a popular tourist attraction.

Trevor Basin

Next to the aqueduct is Trevor Basoi. It is worth stopping at this marina, which is the base for Anglo Welsh boat hire. We hired our boat from here: We review an Anglo Welsh canal boat with our children – is it family friendly?

Canal boats at Trevor Basin

Trevor Basin

There is a small cafe and a couple of lovely walks to view the aqueduct. One walk heads along the Llangollen Canal a short distance, down the original Offa’s Dyke path, through some narrow, steep woodland and out onto a bridge with a great view.

Alternatively, you could head out of the marina towards the aqueduct but before you reach it, turn left onto a public footpath signed Ty Mawr Country Park. Walk along the path and then turn right and head down to the river. It is a lovely spot, with a muddy beach, rocks to climb on and even a paddle in the river on a hot day. You then walk back towards the aqueduct and end up underneath its huge towers. This gives children a chance to appreciate the scale of the 200-year-old structure.

Moor up and explore

The beauty of travellng by boat on the canal is that you can stop almost anywhere. We found lots of lovely country walks this way.

The towpath is usually flat and often gravelled so is fine to cycle or scoot in a lot of places.

If your children are older you can send them off the boat along the towpath and collect them when you catch up with them further ahead.

Enjoy your trip!

RELATED CONTENT: Our 10 top tips for taking children on a canal boat holiday

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The best beaches in and around Dawlish in Devon

The best beaches in and around Dawlish in Devon

Family-friendly beaches that children will love around Dawlish

There are a great selection of lovely beaches in and around Dawlish.

We stayed at Cofton Holiday Park and had a great time exploring the area – read our review and ideas – Delight in Devon on a family holiday to Dawlish with our children.

Here are our pick of the best beaches in and around  Dawlish.

Dawlish Warren

This is a flat, sandy beach with shallow waters. It is very family-friendly with lifeguards keeping watch over the summer months.

It is a Blue Flag beach – awarded for high standards of cleanliness and safety.

The large car park is set behind a grassy area which you walk through to reach the beach.

Dawlish Warren

Dawlish Warren

The sand is separated into sections by rows of wooden groynes. There is a high, sloped wall above the sand so only walk down via the regular steps provided and hold on to younger children’s hands as you approach.

There can be big waves on a windy day which makes the beach good for bodyboards and surfing.

Body boarders in the waves at Dawlish Warren beach

Dawlish Warren

But when the weather is calm it is a safe bathing spot too.

Heading from the town to the beach you drive past a large funfair and there is an ice cream shop and cafe opposite.

If you fancy a good walk, the beach travels up to the mouth of the River Exe. It also backs on to a wildlife reserve.

Dogs are not allowed on Dawlish Warren beach.

Address: Dawlish Warren Beach, Beach Rd, Dawlish, EX7 0NF.

Dawlish

The town of Dawlish has a beach which is a short walk from the centre.

Dawlish railway, beach and sea

Dawlish

It’s quite pebbly and travels all the way to Red Rock at Dawlish Warren.

We went on a windy day and the sight of the big waves bashing the sea wall was spectacular. Although paddling/swimming in the sea was definitely off the agenda.

There’s a railway station next to the beach. The railway line runs alongside the beach and there’s a wide footpath between the line and the sand.

Dawlish is a small but pleasant place for a stroll and there is a car park and on-street parking.

The river and church at Dawlish in Devon

Dawlish

The river runs through a park with ducks and swans. There is mini-golf in the park and plenty of cafes or ice cream shops.

We visited Gaye’s Creamery for their famous ice cream cone with clotted cream on top!

Dogs are allowed on part of the beach.

Address: Dawlish Town Beach, SW Coast Path, Dawlish, EX8 5BT.

We walked right alongside Dawlish beach and found:

Coryton Cove

This beach is about a 10-minute walk from the centre of Dawlish, if you start at the railway tunnel, you can follow the sea path round to the right (with the sea on your left).

Our childen had a great time here, it’s a sandy/stony beach with a sheltered spot/open cave, good for keeping warm unless there’s an easterly wind.

The curved bay is good for swimming and the dramatic red sandstone cliffs with the railway at the bottom forms a spectacular backdrop.

Coryton Cove beach, Dawlish, Devon

Coryton Cove

There are rock pools, a few colourful beach huts (some available for hire), a cafe with ice cream shop and occasional dolphin sightings.

The beach used to be known as Gentleman’s Beach, because in Victorian times only men were allowed to bathe there!

The nearest parking is on the street opposite the railway line. You can cross a footbridge from there to get to the beach or enjoy the view from the coastal path above. There is also a car park and on street parking in Dawlish town centre.

Dogs are not allowed on Coryton Cove beach from May 1 to September 30.

Holcombe Beach

This is one for the adventurous families.

Children on Holcombe Beach in Devon

Holcombe Beach

You park in Holcombe village and then walk down the steep Smuggler’s Lane to access the beach.

From there head under the railway line and up onto a sea wall path.

Keep a close eye on little ones as there are steep drops until you reach some steps down onto the beach. And the steps are narrow and open to the beach.

It is a sandy beach with good waves for bodyboarding.

You also get dramatic red sandstone cliffs at each end which you can imagine as ideal cover for smugglers who made use of this remote beach in years gone by.

There is a kiosk at the bottom of Smuggler’s Lane selling drinks and snacks.

This is also an excellent spot for train spotters as you can get really close to the trains heading in both directions along the line.

Holcombe Beach in Devon

Holcombe Beach

This narrow, isolated beach is used mainly by locals and there are no lifeguards.

Dogs are allowed on Holcombe beach.

Address: Holcombe Beach, Holcombe, Teignmouth, Devon, EX7 0JL.

Cofton Holiday Park near Dawlish in Devon – Family Holiday Guide review

Cofton Holiday Park near Dawlish in Devon – Family Holiday Guide review

We discover if Cofton Holidays is as good as it sounds for a break with children

Name

Cofton Holiday Park/Cofton Holidays

Where is it?

Cofton is at Starcross near Dawlish in south east Devon, 20 minutes from the M5 and Exeter.

What is it?

It’s a five-star holiday park. The 80-acre site is family-run and has won multiple awards and we are very impressed, it’s one of the nicest holiday parks we’ve stayed at.

Camping, tents, caravans and motorhomes at Cofton Holidays in Devon

Is it family friendly?

Yes, very much so, there are lots of facilities for children – indoor and outdoor pools, an arcade and a woodland adventure area.

There are indoor and outdoor play areas for younger children and bookable activities.

It’s a great holiday park for children – our two love it as do we.

Accommodation

There are various options – from camping through to more luxurious options.

Luxury lodges at Coftons

Luxury lodges at Coftons

You can take your own tent, caravan or motorhome.

There are static caravans, luxury holiday lodges with hot tubs and holiday cottages and apartments to choose from.

We stay in a static caravan in a great location, next to the centre where reception, the pools and restaurants are based.

Our static Caravan at Coftons Holidays

Our static caravan

It is warm and cosy with two bedrooms and very comfy beds. The main bedroom has an en-suite, and there’s a separate bathroom with shower.

The double bedroom of our Tamar static caravan at Cofton Holiday Park

The double bedroom

The kitchen/diner/lounge is open plan.

The lounge area of our Tamar static caravan at Cofton Holiday Park

The lounge area

It feels modern and clean, very comfortable with everything we need, except maybe a dishwasher!

The kitchen area of our Tamar static caravan at Cofton Holiday Park

The kitchen area

Food and drink

Two of the restaurants on site serve from the same good menu.

The Swan pub is on the ground floor and includes an outside patio.

The Swan pub at Cofton Holidays

Swan Inn

Amelia’s upstairs is bigger and also includes outdoor seating overlooking the pool. There is a soft play area off this restaurant for under-eights.

Evening meals and Sunday carveries are also served in the Warren Retreat – an area which hosts children’s discos, live cabaret and other entertainment. This area is closed when we visit due to Covid restrictions.

Warren Retreat restaurant and bar at Cofton Holidays

Warren Retreat

There’s also a fish and chip takeaway and a small shop selling essentials including bread and milk.

Facilities

*Swimming pools

There’s a lovely heated indoor swimming pool, which we use nearly every day. It is perfectly warm and a real hit with us all.

It is all one depth, there are splash taps and large, clean changing rooms.

The indoor pool at Cofton Holiday Park

Indoor pool

There’s also a heated outdoor pool, open over the summer, great for warmer days.

Outdoor pool at Cofton Holiday Park

Outdoor pool

*Arcade

There is an arcade with lots of games. It also has American pool tables and a mini tenpin bowling alley with four lanes.

*Gym

*Woodland adventure area

At the top of the site and at the base of a forest Is a wooden adventure area complete with zip wire, assault course and climbing nets.

Woodland adventure play area at Cofton Holidays

Woodland adventure play area

*Playground

There is an outdoor play area with swings and climbing frames.

*Soft play

There’s a soft play area for younger children (closed when we were there due to Covid restrictions).

*Coarse fishing

Anglers are well catered for here – there are well-stocked fishing lakes and fishing competitons. Assisted fishing is available for adults and children. All fish caught are put back into the water.

Fishing lake at Cofton Holiday Park

Entertainment

There are activities for children in the day – when we stay, youngsters can learn to fish or try pond dipping. At other times there are children’s discos in the evening and other entertainment.

Children's fishing lesson at Cofton Holidays

Learning to fish

Nearby

*Beaches

The nearest beach is the Blue Flag beach at Dawlish Warren. It’s a 35-minute walk or a seven-minute drive. There’s a big car park next to it which can get busy and a fun fair. Life guards are on duty during the summer months.

Dawlish Warren beach

Dawlish Warren

*Dawlish

The town has a river, sea walk, crazy golf and places to eat plus Dawlish Town Beach.

Dawlish railway, beach and sea

Dawlish

*Haldon Forest Park

This is 3,500 acres of woodland with three walking trails and four cycling rails (bikes can be hired).

We also see a few groups on Segway tours.

*Exeter

Exeter is twenty minutes away, read our review and guide for visiting Exeter with children.

Dogs

Dogs are welcome at Cofton – and are even allowed in the Swan Inn. Plus there are loads of dog walks in the area.

Covid restrictions at Cofton 2020

Coronavirus restrictions were in place for our visit  – we find the site to be very clean and the staff are fantastic.

Precautions have been taken – activities and entertainment adapted, pool sessions are an hour and need to be booked and there is an app you can use to order food in the restaurants.

Masks have to be worn by adults in the shop, reception and arcade.

There is hand sanitizer in key places such as at the playgrounds.

All in all, we feel very happy with the arrangements.

Try to book pool sessions, activities and restaurants before you go if possible as they are popular.

*For Cofton’s latest Covid-19 policy, visit here.

For more information on the area surrounding the park and a full review of our holiday read: Delight in Devon on a family holiday to Dawlish with our children.

Cofton Holidays information

Holiday homes start from £165 for a three-night weekend stay, £148 for a four-night mid-week break or £224 for a week.

Wheelchair accessible, dog-friendly and hot tub holiday homes are available.

Cofton also has luxury lodges (new for 2020), dog-friendly cottages and Georgian-style apartments available.

To book: visit coftonholidays.co.uk or call 01626 890111

Address: Cofton Holidays, Starcross, Near Dawlish, South Devon, EX6 8RP

Email: info@coftonholidays.co.uk

Phone: 01626 890111

RELATED CONTENT: Delight in Devon on a family holiday to Dawlish with our children

RELATED CONTENT: We discover all the best places and activities for children in Exeter, Devon

(We received a complimentary stay for the purpose of this review, all views are our own).

Delight in Devon on a family holiday to Dawlish with our children

Delight in Devon on a family holiday to Dawlish with our children

We take our children to Cofton Holiday Park and explore the surrounding beaches and attractions

“This is amazing,” says our son and we all feel the same.

The sheer joy of a family swim makes the months of lockdown seem a distant memory.

This perfectly warm indoor pool is just one of the excellent facilities at Cofton Holiday Park near Dawlish in Devon.

The indoor pool at Cofton Holiday Park

Indoor pool

Swim sessions are pre-booked and limited to an hour to ensure the pool isn’t too crowded while Covid precautions are in place.

It is the same with Cofton’s large outdoor pool, which opens over the warmer months.

The pools are at the centre of the sprawling site along with restaurants and arcade and it’s all just a short walk from our static caravan.

We are in a Tamar model and it is a superb place to stay – modern, spotlessly clean, with two smart TVs, fast WiFi, two bathrooms, good kitchen facilities and plenty of space in the well laid out lounge/dining area.

Our static Caravan at Coftons Holidays

Our static caravan

There are also luxury lodges with hot tubs, holiday cottages or you can bring your own tent, caravan or motorhome.

The lounge area of our Tamar static caravan at Cofton Holiday Park

The lounge area

Children could spend their whole holiday at Cofton – there’s also a woodland adventure park with zip line, small playground, fishing lakes and woods to explore.

Woodland adventure playground at Cofton Holiday Park

It would also be pretty easy to eat here every night with three restaurants (one closed during our visit), serving good family food and drinks at reasonable prices. There is also an excellent fish and chip shop and a small store on site selling essential food and drinks.

The outdoor pool and restaurants at Cofton Holidays

The outdoor pool and restaurants

Plus there are children’s activities run by the entertainment team with daily activities like pond dipping, fishing lessons and pirate adventures, when we visit.

Our daughter gives you a tour of the site in this video! Plus read and see more details of our caravan and the site here: Cofton Holiday Park near Dawlish in Devon

Exploring the area

With beautiful Devon on our doorsteps we have to get out and about too.

The beaches are our main aim and the nearest is Dawlish Warren. You can walk from the site – up steep woodland, along a footpath to a walk which takes about half an hour.

Alternatively it is a 10-minute drive from Cofton to the beach’s large car park, past a popular funfair.

This child-friendly flat beach stretches along a sand spit at the mouth of the Exe estuary.

Dawlish Warren

Dawlish Warren

It’s good for games and sandcastle building, there are lifeguards patrolling during the summer and a cafe and ice cream shop.

We also spend time at Coryton Cove near Dawlish, a sheltered partly sandy spot with a cafe.

For an adventurous trip out, try Holcombe Beach. You can’t park there but have to leave your car in the village and negotiate the steep Smuggler’s Lane.

Once you walk under the railway line, which hugs the shore, you come out on a high sea wall path (beware, there’s a sheer, high drop) with steep, narrow steps leading down to the sand.

Holcombe Beach in Devon

Holcombe Beach

The beach is good for bodyboarding and offers great views with dramatic red sandstone cliffs at both ends. If you love train-spotting then you can stand inches from the main railway line as services whizz past.

For a more sedate pace of life, try Dawlish town with its gentle river running though the park and traditional seaside appeal.

The river and church at Dawlish in Devon

Dawlish

Devon clotted cream ice creams from Gaye’s Creamery, eaten beside the ducks floating along the weirs on the river makes for a relaxing afternoon.

You can also enjoy the crashing waves along the sea wall and games of mini-golf.

Cofton Holdays is only 20 minutes from Exeter and a similar drive to the hills of Dartmoor.

Haldon Forest Park with its range of bike and walking trails is another good option if you want to head inland.

Back at the park

Coftons Holiday Park - view from the hill

After one hearty dinner at the park’s Amelia’s Cafe, as the evening sun shines over the rolling hills, we set out to explore the area on foot.

We look down to the holiday park laid out before us. “This is amazing,” I say.

RELATED CONTENT: Cofton Holiday Park near Dawlish in Devon – Family Holiday Guide review

RELATED CONTENT: We discover all the best places and activities for children in Exeter, Devon

We discover all the best places and activities for children in Exeter, Devon

We discover all the best places and activities for children in Exeter, Devon

We take a trip down memory lane in Exeter and find out if it is family-friendly and good for children

A tatty white door, three overflowing bins and a weed-covered driveway isn’t the normal tourist photo opportunity.

But it’s the outside of this terraced house in Exeter which has inspired our visit.

It’s where my husband lived when he was at university in Devon – and now he’s come back with a wife and two children in tow.

Dad and children at Exeter University

His time as a student hadn’t resulted in much knowledge of whether the city was child-friendly.

But on our short break we discover there is plenty – apart from taking a trip with dad down memory lane – to entertain the little ones.

Exeter’s Quayside

This is the best place to start – the bustling waterfront has quirky shops, bars, restaurants and wide paths for cycling, scooting and strolling alongside the River Exe and Exeter Canal.

The exterior of Saddles & Paddles in Exeter

Saddles & Paddles

We take a different mode of transport by hopping into a canoe, hired from Saddles & Paddles on the Quayside. As the name suggests they hire bikes and boats from a waterside store.

After a cheery and comprehensive briefing, the four of us are paddling, occasionally even in unison, along the river and then canal.

Family canoe ride on the River Exe in Exeter

Family canoe ride on the River Exe in Exeter

We work as a team to travel the two miles or so to the Double Locks pub where you can moor up and grab a drink in the large garden, which has a playground and plenty of space.

We then turn round and head back to the Quay, returning via a super low bridge which you have to duck under.

The canal is very safe as no motorboats are on it, just canoeists, kayakers and paddleboarders. It is a peaceful and fun way to start our visit.

Where is child-friendly to eat in Exeter?

After working up an appetite, we tuck into giant pizzas at On The Waterfront, which is next to Saddles & Paddles. It has good outside seating and an atmospheric inside in an old customs house.

On the Waterfront pizza restaurant in Exeter

On the Waterfront restaurant

The children’s pizzas, only £6 each, disappear in a flash and even our large adult portions go down well. This is a good, friendly, relaxed family restaurant.

On the opposite side of the water, in a glass building, sits another excellent eatery.

Lobster at Rockfish in Exeter

Lobster at Rockfish

Rockfish is a chain with restaurants around the South West. It’s known for its fresh seafood and changes its dish of the day daily to reflect what’s come out of the waters around Devon.

I have a fabulous lobster and our children tuck into tasty fish and chips.

Child fish and chips at Rockfish in Exeter

The children’s menu, well priced at £7.95, includes an ice cream dessert and a great pack of goodies to keep them entertained.

It has a puzzle book, dolphin jigsaw, card games and colouring pencils.

The activities all carry a message about protecting the maritime environment.

Children's bag of goodies at Rockfish restaurant in Exeter

Exeter Cathedral

Once you’ve headed up the steep streets (Exeter is a fairly hilly city) into the city centre, the cathedral should be your first stop.

The Cathedral Green is a lovely space and inside the large cathedral (entrance £5 adults, children free) you can collect a free children’s activity booklet, guiding you around the building with questions and clues to answer about what’s inside. There is also brass rubbing sheets you can do at a cost of £2.

Mum and children outside Exeter Cathedral

Exeter Cathedral

Northernhay Gardens

Exeter is an historic city with links to the Romans, Normans and more. You can wander past Sir Francis Drake’s favourite pub – the half timbered Ship Inn, as you walk from the cathedral to the castle.

It is more castle walls really than traditional fortress but most of the walls sit in Northernhay Gardens, the oldest public open space in Britain, which dates back to the 1600s.

Northernhay Gardens in Exeter

Northernhay Gardens

Today the gardens are peaceful, picturesque and a good space for children to run around.

Gandy Street

If you exit the gardens via the war memorial and turn left you come to Exeter’s most colourful street, Gandy Street, with coffee shops and bars lining the cobbles. It is a good spot to stop for snack or drink.

The RAMM and Underground Passages

Two of the city’s other top attractions are closed when we visit.

The Royal Albert Memorial Museum and Art Gallery (RAMM) reveals the area’s rich history and global connections.

And we were sad to miss the city’s Underground Passages where guided tours have taken place since the 1930s. They were designed to bring clean drinking water from natural springs outside the walled city.

Underground Passages in Exeter

The Underground Passages (pic: Mike Alsford)

Haldon Forest Park

One place which wasn’t closed – and very much open to the elements as we discover on a wet walk – is Haldon Forest Park.

Stick man at Haldon Forest Park

Haldon Forest Park

About four miles outside the city, this large woodland area is packed with walkers, cyclists and Segway riders.

There is a Go Ape course, cafe, playground and lots of different length trails to tackle. As it’s pouring, we take the simple green route, which is a 1.5 mile circular walk with spectacular views out towards the sea.

You could easily spend most of the day at this large park, especially if you brought bikes with you.

Surrounding area

There are other attractions on the outskirts of Exeter like Crealy Theme Park and Darts Farm Shopping Village.

The city is only around half an hour from the seaside resorts of Exmouth and Dawlish, as well as the hills of Dartmoor.

If you wanted to you could base yourself in the city and explore all of those areas.

But our time in Exeter is up and we have created plenty of new family memories to add to the student stories from two decades ago.

For more ideas go to Visit Exeter.

RELATED CONTENT: Delight in Devon on a family holiday to Dawlish with our children

RELATED CONTENT: Cofton Holiday Park near Dawlish in Devon – Family Holiday Guide review

We were provided with complimentary meals and activities through Visit Exeter for this trip. All opinions are our own.

Liverpool family attraction popular with young children, closes for good

Liverpool family attraction popular with young children, closes for good

Mattel Play! will not be reopening following coronavirus closure

It was popular with youngsters who loved children’s favourites Thomas & Friends, Fireman Sam and Bob the Builder.

But now Mattel Play! on the Royal Albert Dock has closed for good.

The adventure play centre at the Albert Dock launched in 2016 and was the first of its kind in Europe.

It was split into three themed areas dedicated to the iconic characters.

The Heritage Great Britain attraction closed in March to prevent the spread of coronavirus but has now revealed that it will not reopen.

Harold the Helicopter's sits in the middle of a ball pool at Mattel Play

Harold the Helicopter’s ball pool

A spokesperson said: “Following five wonderful years at the Albert Dock, we have taken the difficult decision to close Mattel Play! Liverpool.

“As the focus of the Albert Dock continued to be more bars and restaurants, we have therefore, following a discussion with the landlord, agreed to exit our lease earlier than planned.

“We would have very much liked to have remained at the Albert Dock throughout the summer months but the onset of the coronavirus pandemic, and the consequences which are likely to be felt for many months, made this ambition untenable.”

This website reviewed Mattel Play! and thought it was great for younger children who were fans of Fireman Sam, Bob the Builder and Thomas.

Fans of Thomas & Friends would also love Drayton Manor Park, reviewed here: Thomas the Tank Engine proves just the ticket for a boy’s birthday break at Drayton Manor hotel and theme park

Harry Potter Studio Tour London to reopen with new safety measures in place

Harry Potter Studio Tour London to reopen with new safety measures in place

Warner Bros Studio Tour London – The Making of Harry Potter gets ready to reopen to wizarding fans following Coronavirus closure

Harry Potter fans will not be waiting much longer for the reopening of the hugely successful Warner Bros Studio Tour in London.

The Making of Harry Potter – a look behind the scenes of the wizarding films – will reopen on Thursday, August 20.

It was forced to close earlier in 2020 due to the Covid 19 pandemic.

The attraction is at the actual Warner Bros studios near London where a lot of the filming for the eight Harry Potter films took place.

It includes sets like the Gryffindor Common Room, Hogwarts Great Hall, Diagon Alley and Gringotts Bank alongside thousands of props and costumes.

The Great Hall in Harry Potter

The Great Hall (Photo: Warner Bros. Studio Tour London – The Making of Harry Potter)

And from the opening date, the Slytherin Common Room can be seen for the first time along with iconic costumes and props belonging to some of the house’s cunning characters.

The Slytherin common room in the Harry Potter movies

The Slytherin common room in the Harry Potter movies

So what will be different when Harry Potter Studio Tour London reopens?

There will be a number of Covid 19 safety measures in place.

The attraction has made some changes to manage social distancing and keep everything extra clean.

Do you have to wear face masks?

Visitors aged 11 and over must wear a face mask unless medically exempt. They can be taken off when the wearer is sitting down in a cafe.

How will social distancing be managed?

There will be less visitor numbers and there will be a one-way system around the studios.

The shops and cafés will only accept cashless or contactless payment options .

Cars will be parked with spaces in between.

What will not be open?

Hogwarts Express on plaform 9 and three quarters at the Harry Potter Studio Tour London

Hogwarts Express (Photo: Warner Bros. Studio Tour London – The Making of Harry Potter)

The Hogwarts Express train carriage

Inside Privet Drive

The cloakroom and left luggage facilities

The Studio Tour shuttle bus service to and from Watford Junction Station will not be available

Will the toilets be open?

Toilets will be open with extra hygiene measures in place.

Will the studios be cleaned more regularly?

Yes, there will be extra cleaning throughout the day, especially of touch-points such as door handles and barriers.

And hand sanitiser stations will be positioned throughout.

Gringotts Wizarding Bank

Gringotts (Photo: Warner Bros. Studio Tour London – The Making of Harry Potter)

Will the cafes be open?

The Hub cafes, Food Hall and Backlot Cafe will be open but there will be less menu choices.

Seating in the cafe will be spaced and visitors must not pay with cash.

We have loads of useful Harry Potter Studio tour information and tips for you

READ NOW: Harry Potter Studio Tour London – our full guide, review and must-read tips

READ NOW: Harry Potter Studio Tour London – EVERYTHING you need to know

The studio tour is still pre-book only, tickets are available now from the website.

Review and pictures: Abbeywood Estate and Gardens in Cheshire

Review and pictures: Abbeywood Estate and Gardens in Cheshire

We take our children to Abbeywood Estate and Gardens in Delamere

What is it?

A country house with 45 acres of gardens, a small playground and woodland trails. Also a wedding venue.

Children at Abbeywood Estate in Delamere, Cheshire

Where is it?

Between Northwich and Chester directly off the main A556 road.

What did we think?

This is a quiet, relaxing spot for a fun family walk with an excellent cafe. The gardens are beautiful.

Gardens at Abbeywood Estate in Delamere, Cheshire

Highlights

Woodland trail – The landscaped gardens are stunning but the best part for our children was the woodland trail around the perimeter of the site.

You can follow the signs around, with a few shortcuts available if you want. The walk takes around an hour.

Woodland trail through Abbeywood Estate in Delamere, Cheshire

Playground – There is a small playground in shaded woodland with a climbing frame, swings and trampoline (closed when we went due to the Coronavirus).

Play area at Abbeywood Estate in Delamere, Cheshire

Animals – You can spot different animals on your walk.

There are a few horses, goats, sheep and an enclosure with chickens and rabbits. There aren’t loads of animals like a petting zoo but they are a pleasant distraction on the walk.

Animals at Abbeywood Estate in Delamere, Cheshire

Top tips

The map you are given at the entry doesn’t show the full size of the gardens so make sure you don’t miss out on parts of the woodland trail.

You can’t take picnics so make sure you eat in the car park or use the cafe.

Gardens at Abbeywood Estate in Delamere, Cheshire

Abbeywood Estate and Gardens information

Food: There is a large, pleasant cafe with indoor and outdoor seating, selling hot meals, sandwiches, cakes, drinks and tubs of ice cream.

Opening hours: The gardens are open Wednesday to Sunday in summer between 9am and 5pm.

Cost: Adults £6 each, children free.

Best for: Ages three and above.

Time needed: 90 minutes.

Access and restrictions: The site is mainly lawned with a few gravel paths. It is fairly flat but isn’t fully accessible for wheelchair users and for prams and pushchairs.

Address: Abbeywood Gardens, Chester Rd, Delamere, Northwich, CW8 2HS.

 

Canal boat holiday guide for beginners – EVERYTHING you need to know

Canal boat holiday guide for beginners – EVERYTHING you need to know

Our 14 most important tips for first time canal boaters

You don’t need a license or even any training to ‘drive’ a narrowboat but it can be a daunting experience to take the helm of such a long vessel for the first time.

Boat hire companies should tell you the basics before you set off but the more you know, the less stressed you’ll be to enjoy your holiday.

We recently took our two children on our first canal boat holiday and made plenty of mistakes!

Here’s what we wished we had known – read our full guide for novice canal boat users.

And if you are taking children don’t miss: Our 10 top tips for taking children on a canal boat holiday

Which side of the canal to travel in your boat

Navigate along the middle of the canal where the water should be deeper but when passing another moving boat, stay on the RIGHT – remember it is the opposite side to road travel in the UK.

Speed

The speed limit is 4mph, walkers will overtake you. Slow down when passing moored boats, other moving boats, when going around corners and approaching tunnels. If you make a breaking wash behind you, you are going too fast.

How to stop

You use reverse to slow down and to stop a narrowboat. Small thrusts on the throttle and then back to neutral will slow the boat down quickly and smoothly.

Right of way

When approaching a bridge or a tunnel with room for only one boat, the craft nearest has the right of way. When waiting, stop and keep to the right.

Give way to non-powered craft like canoes and rowing boats.

Steering

The tiller is at the back of the boat. Move the tiller in the opposite direction to the way you want to go – pushing it right sends the boat left and left sends it right. It can be hard to remember this when you are panicking!

Try to always think ahead as a canal boat can be slow to react to a turn, especially at low revs when you will have less control. The turn will continue after you want it to if you don’t centre the tiller before the turn is completed.

Also be aware that as the boat turns in the middle, the front might be okay but the rear may hit something. To move the back of the boat (the stern), push the tiller the way you want the rear to go.

If you are in danger of hitting something put the throttle in reverse to slow down or stop.

How to park/moor a narrowboat

You can park where you like as long as it does not create an obstruction such as just before a lock, near to a bridge, on a corner or at a water point.

Approach slowly and when you are parallel with the side, use reverse gear. Get close enough so that a passenger can step off safely with a rope.

Look for mooring points with rings in the ground as these are the simplest to use. Otherwise you can use a mooring pin/metal stake which you hammer into the ground. Make sure you hammer the mooring pin right into the ground or it may be pulled free by the weight of the boat.

Tie the boat at the front and back, I asked our instructor to show me twice how to tie the ropes to ensure I got it right and was very glad I had.

Keep the rope tight – if it is loose, the boat will bang against the side when other boats pass or can come away altogether if not knotted properly.

Askrigg narrowboat from Anglo Welsh, bond class

Bond class narrowboat, Askrigg

How to turn your canal boat around

If you need to turn your narrowboat around, there are turning places every few miles called winding holes or swinging areas.

These are wider parts of the canal, marked on maps that you can plan for in advance.

When you are turning, keep the propeller and rudder away from shallow water and debris. Aim to put the bow/front of the boat into the winding hole, reverse and then go forwards and away in the other direction.

Look out for the wind or current causing difficulties and if necessary, someone can step on to the towpath and use a rope to help.

The wind once prevented us from making a turn and a friendly man on the side asked us to throw him a rope so he could help out. He said it had happened to several boats before us which made me feel better!

Tunnels

Listen and look out for boats already heading towards you through the tunnel if it is too narrow for two boats.

If the way is clear, put on your headlights and sound the horn before entering the tunnel. Turn the internal lights on too.

Make sure nobody is on the roof or the side of the boat.

Coming out from a tunnel on the Llangollen Canal

Coming out from a tunnel

Small bridges

When heading towards a small bridge, the space to navigate through can appear alarmingly narrow.

Do your best to line up the boat as you approach, get the front end into position and under the bridge. Then steer the back through. You may hit the sides but it shouldn’t do any harm at a slow speed.

Swing bridge

You use a lock key to wind the bridge up, it can seem as if it is not fully open if it hangs a little over so be careful when navigating underneath it.

Close the bridge behind you unless there is another boat waiting to use it.

Canal swing bridge on the Llangollen Canal

Canal swing bridge

Locks

A lock is used to raise or lower a boat to the level of the water ahead.

They can be pretty daunting the first time you use them as there is a lot to think about.

There is usually a queue of boats so wait your turn and don’t be afraid to ask someone to help you. We did and having expert reassurance from seasoned boaters made the lock experience more relaxing.

Remember, if you are going up, the lock needs to be empty first and if you are coming down, the lock has to be full.

One person needs to get off the boat before the lock, armed with a lock key called a windlass. They slowly and carefully open and close the gates and the paddles which let the water in and out, in the correct order.

The person at the helm has to steer the boat into the lock and keep it as far forward as possible as there is a ledge/cill at the back which the boat can get caught on – look out for the cill marker to show you where it is.

 

The view from up high in a lock on the Llangollen Canal

Navigating a lock on the Llangollen Canal

Water

Filling up water is simple but there aren’t that many places to do it. Boat hire companies recommend you fill up every day, we found that wasn’t essential but every other day is a must.

You can stop at a water point (marked on the map and signposted) and operate the tap using the Yale key your boat hire company should have given you.

You connect one end of the boat’s hose pipe to the tap and insert the other end into the hole of the boat’s water tank.

We were told the water can be drunk but we had taken bottled water.

Pump out

Canal boats have chemical toilets which hold the waste in a tank on board.

We did not need to empty ours but check with your hire company how to  at a pump-out point if you are staying on the boat long enough to need to do so.

Have fun

Work together – we naturally found which jobs we were best at and got much better at mooring and doing all the necessary checks.

Take it in turns to steer and relax and make sure you enjoy the slow pace of life, the surroundings, the friendliness of people you pass and have fun.

RELATED CONTENT: Top 10 canal boat family holiday destinations in England and Wales

RELATED CONTENT: Our 10 top tips for taking children on a canal boat holiday

RELATED CONTENT: Canal boat family holiday review – we take our children on a 67 foot barge

RELATED CONTENT: We review an Anglo Welsh canal boat with our children – is it family friendly?

Our 10 top tips for taking children on a canal boat holiday

Our 10 top tips for taking children on a canal boat holiday

How to keep children happy and safe on a narrowboat trip

To our children’s great excitement, we recently took them on a narrowboat holiday  – the prospect of our own barge for a few days really captured their imagination.

Home for the break was a 67-foot boat along the Llangollen Canal between Shropshire and Wales (full story here).

We loved the sense of freedom and slow pace of life and learned a lot in a short space of time.

But how do you keep children happy and safe on a canal boat holiday?

First off – are children safe on a canal boat?

We felt that at aged nine and six, our children would be safe – they both swim and follow instructions, plus they were happy to wear life jackets.

To be honest, I would not have wanted to take this holiday when they were toddlers.

It would be hard work and you would need to keep an eye on them at all times. Plus you would need more than two adults when going through locks for example – one to helm, one to operate the lock and another to look after the children.

How to prepare children for a canal boat holiday

You will want your children to be excited about the holiday and all they can do to help.

But also make sure to give them some general safety advice.

Talk them calmly through the dangers and how to stay safe. You could also show them a video.

General safety advice for children on narrowboats

A girl wears a life jacket life vest on a canal narrowboat

Children should wear a like jacket

*Wear lifejackets and non-slip shoes

*Don’t run by the water

*Don’t lean too far over the side

*Step on and off the boat when it is safe to do so, don’t try to jump across a gap.

*Be very careful at locks and listen to instructions. Locks have steep sides and water comes in and out quickly.

*Children should always be supervised by an adult.

What to pack for children on a canal boat holiday

*Comfortable clothes including shorts and fleeces.

*Anorak and waterproofs.

*Non-slip shoes.

*Life jackets/buoyancy aids – check with your boat hire company if they are provided, ours were with Anglo Welsh.

*Sun cream.

*Scooters or bikes if allowed as large sections of the canal towpath are flat and have a hard surface. You can send one adult off with the children while the other steers the boat. But check with your hire company how many are allowed and where you can keep them.

*Most importantly, pack activities for the children to do while travelling (see next section).

What activities to take for children on a canal holiday?

It’s a fantastic novelty for children to be in a floating home, relaxing, playing, watching the world go past, helping with some of the jobs.

But there are also hours spent travelling where kids can get bored.

Take reading books, activity books, board games, toys, paper and pens with you plus tablets or whatever else your children enjoy to pass the time.

If there is WiFi and a television, they may not work.

Pack a camera children can use to take photos, but not an expensive one in case it falls in the canal!

Take some binoculars. You can get children wildlife spotting and feeding the ducks.

And there will be plenty to teach them about the history of the canals.

Or take hats and pretend to be pirates.

Don’t go too far

It’s tempting to power on to new destinations with a tick-list of achievements.

But be flexible, the best times on our trip were when we ended up in a random spot in the evening and headed off in the fresh air to explore nearby footpaths, fields and woods.

Children exploring the countryside at St Martin's in Shropshire

Exploring the countryside at St Martin’s in Shropshire

So don’t be too rigid and build in plenty of stops if the weather is dry, so that children can stretch their legs and whoever is at the helm can relax.

Tunnels

If children are inside, make sure the lights are on when you go through a tunnel else it will go very dark very quickly and they won’t be able to see.

If they are outside, ensure an adult is with them and they stay seated as tunnels can be very narrow and low.

Our two loved the tunnels and we played an echo game to keep them entertained but they can be very long and dark so some children could be scared.

Warn them that you will be turning the headlight on and sounding the horn before entering.

And obviously ensure nobody is on the roof or side of the boat.

Going through Chirk Tunnel in Wales

Going through Chirk Tunnel in Wales

What jobs can children do to help on a boating holiday

There are different boating jobs children can help with depending on their age.

They can help plan the route, keep the boat tidy, cast off and tie the ropes.

Older children can help with the steering under supervision.

They can also help with working the locks as long as they know how to do so safely.

However, don’t get them doing every lock with you because they get just as much fun from sitting on the boat as it rises or falls in the lock.

Younger ones can look out for tunnels, bridges and oncoming boats.

We got our children to keep tabs on the number of each bridge because that tells you whereabouts you are on the canal.

Our daughter helps lift a bridge at Froncysyllte in Wales

Our daughter helps lift a bridge at Froncysyllte in Wales

What route to take with children

Pick places which will entertain children – work around stopping points which have family attractions where possible.

For instance we made sure to stop at Ellesmere because of its lake walk, playground and sculpture trail.

Pick spots which are near to playgrounds, woodland walks or leisure centres.

Blakemere at Ellesmere

Blakemere at Ellesmere

Have fun

Most importantly have lots of fun. You can feel like a real team on this sort of a holiday and it will certainly be one they remember.

RELATED CONTENT: Canal boat holiday guide for beginners – EVERYTHING you need to know

RELATED CONTENT: Canal boat family holiday review – we take our children on a 67 foot barge

RELATED CONTENT: We review an Anglo Welsh canal boat with our children – is it family friendly?

RELATED CONTENT: Top 10 canal boat family holiday destinations in England and Wales

 

We review an Anglo Welsh canal boat with our children – is it family friendly?

We review an Anglo Welsh canal boat with our children – is it family friendly?

We share all the details of our 67 foot bond class Anglo Welsh barge

Boat hire company Anglo Welsh has more than 160 narrowboats at 11 bases across England and Wales.

We hired one from its Trevor Basin site in north Wales to take across the famous Pontcysyllte Aqueduct on the Llangollen Canal into Shropshire.

It was our first canal boat trip and we booked it through Drifters Waterway Holidays.

We had a great time (read our full review) Here we’ll look at the boat in more detail and explain how suitable it is for children.

Our boat

We hired a 4-6 berth canal boat called Askrigg, a bond class narrowboat, which is one of the most luxurious that Anglo Welsh offers.

Askrigg narrowboat from Anglo Welsh, bond class

Bond class narrowboat, Askrigg

Space

Let’s start with space and there was plenty of it. The length of the boat is 67 feet and it’s nearly 7 feet wide. It doesn’t even feel that narrow.

It’s quite dauntingly long when you take the helm for the first time but it is fabulous for the children to have so much room to move about and play.

Layout

Starting at the rear is a bedroom with two small single beds.

One f the bedrooms on the canal boat Askrigg with two single beds

There are two small beds in one bedroom

A narrow corridor, which could be a squeeze for some, runs alongside the next three rooms.

There is a bathroom, a bedroom with a double bed followed by a second identical bathroom.

One f the bedrooms on the canal boat Askrigg with a double bed

The other bedroom has a small double bed

It opens up into a galley area with kitchen and dining table with sofa-seating which converts into another bed if needed.

At the front of the boat are two leather chairs facing a TV and radio.

Inside the Anglo Welsh narrowboat Askrigg

Inside the Anglo Welsh narrowboat Askrigg

It’s a great layout and worked well for us – having two bedrooms and two bathrooms is a real bonus.

There are places to sit outside at the front and rear of the boat.

Was it easy to helm?

It is straightforward, once you’ve grasped that turning the tiller right makes the boat go left and vice versa.

As you steer from the rear, take glasses if you need them!

It’s good fun, rewarding but never relaxing when you are at the helm. It’s definitely best to take it in turns if there are two of you, to give each of you a chance to fully enjoy the experience.

What about equipment?

The boat is very well equipped. We found plenty of crockery, pots and pans, cutlery and cooking utensils. It was all in an excellent condition, very clean, and most of it looked new.

There is a gas oven, grill and four-ring hob as well as a microwave (only use the microwave when the engine is running or it will sap all your power). A kettle to boil on the hob is provided as well as a fridge freezer.

Bedding and towels are provided, along with a hairdryer and a couple of folding chairs.

What about gadgets?

There is a small TV with signal dependent on your location – we didn’t get ours to work but it does take DVDs.

There is also a radio and CD player.

In the lounge area are two plug sockets and underneath the television is a cigarette lighter point.

Try to charge mobile phones and other devices while the boat is moving as electricity drops when the engine is turned off.

Is there space to shower?

The bathrooms are a fairly tight squeeze for an adult around the toilet and sink areas but the showers were large, powerful and warmed up instantly.

Don’t forget to pump out the shower using the button at the side of it where you are done. A new bar of soap is supplied in each bathroom.

The chemical toilets are flushed using a lever with your foot.

Canal boat toilets use a sealed holding tank on board which you empty at a pump-out point if and when you need to – we didn’t.

Is there enough water and can you drink it?

There is initially enough water onboard for at least a day.

You can stop at a water point (marked on the map and signposted) and access the tap using a key Anglo Welsh give you.

You connect one end of the boat’s hose pipe to the tap and insert the other end into the hole of the boat’s water tank.

It’s a really simple process once you’ve managed to moor up!

We were told that it’s best to fill up every day, but we were careful with our water usage and managed every other day.

You can apparently drink the water but we took bottled.

How does electricity work on an Anglo Welsh boat?

We never ran out of power. An inverter on the boat converts the power from the onboard batteries.

The amount of power available depends on how long the engine has been running so keep it running for a time when you are moored (but not after 8pm).

It’s recommended to charge mobiles and tablets etc when the engine is running so you don’t drain the batteries.

Was there heating on the boat?

All the company’s boats have gas central heating with radiators and ours was cosy and warm.

There’s also a multi-fuel stove, which we didn’t use.

Are there life jackets/buoyancy aids?

If you request them when you book, you can chose a life jacket to fit when you are at the boatyard before you depart. Both our children had one and were happy to wear them.

Girl wears a life jacket on a canal barge

Are pets allowed?

Yes, up to two dogs are allowed, one is free to bring, a second costs £25 or £35 depending on the length of stay.

Are bikes allowed?

You can take one or two bikes but they have to be kept outside and you need to be careful when going under bridges or tunnels if you leave them on the roof.

Was it clean and Covid-compliant?

Canal boating is an excellent socially-distanced holiday option as you have self-contained accommodation and you are never too close to other people.

Our boat was very clean and had been thoroughly disinfected beforehand. Anti-bacterial spray and cleaning products were supplied on board.

Do they tell you how to use the boat?

Yes, the handover is very thorough. Ours took an hour as the Anglo Welsh staff member explained every aspect of the boat, how to helm it, all the safety precautions and more.

He also had plenty of time for questions and even headed out of the marina with us for the first few hundred yards of our journey to help with any teething problems and offer tips.

On arrival back, the staff turned our boat round for us and moored it.

Trevor Basin

We collected our boat from Trevor Basin in north Wales. There is free parking at the boatyard and we were able to park right next to the barge, which was great for loading and unloading.

Conclusion

A great space for children with everything you could need.

This was a Drifters holiday, for more information go to www.drifters.co.uk.

RELATED CONTENT: Our 10 top tips for taking children on a canal boat holiday

RELATED CONTENT: Canal boat family holiday review – we take our children on a 67 foot barge

RELATED CONTENT: Canal boat holiday guide for beginners – EVERYTHING you need to know

RELATED CONTENT: Top 10 canal boat family holiday destinations in England and Wales

*We were given a complimentary break, all views are our own.

Canal boat family holiday review – we take our children on a 67-foot barge

Canal boat family holiday review – we take our children on a 67-foot barge

Our first boating holiday takes in the famous Pontyscyllte Aqueduct on the Llangollen Canal

I have been in charge of an 18-tonne canal boat the length of a lorry for roughly a minute.

Concentrating hard, I navigate on to the Pontyscyllte Aqueduct, the width of our craft Askrigg, trying to ignore the 40-metre sheer drop on one side into the River Dee.

The expert, who has just given us an hour’s worth of thorough instructions, steps off the barge and we are alone crossing the longest aqueduct in Britain and the highest in the world.

As introductions to canal life goes, there’s nothing like being thrown in at the deep end as our two children enjoy the ride and my husband helps direct from the front – almost 70 feet away.

We are on a Drifters waterways holiday and our Anglo Welsh boat has just left Trevor basin near Llangollen in north east Wales.

About to depart in a narrowboat from Trevor basin

About to depart from Trevor basin

Our four-day route is along the Llangollen Canal with overnight stops at the border village of Chirk and the Shropshire town of Ellesmere.

I quickly discover that canal boating is simultaneously very relaxing and stressful. Once we cross the aqueduct with its amazing views, there are other boats to dodge, tight turns to master and long tunnels to chug through.

There’s even a swing bridge to lift and our six-year-old gets out, armed with the windlass (the tool to lift canal locks and bridges) and starts helping turn the gauge to raise it high above the canal and allow us to pass through.

Children can help lift swing bridges on the canal

At first, bridges and locks may be daunting but they quickly become part of the fun, giving the children some activity and making them feel part of the team.

Luckily, every boater seems friendly and happy to help if you get in a fix.

Helming takes some practice, the boat is steered from the rear with a tiller. You may find yourself gently bumping the sides, glancing off low bridges or getting stuck in shallow water.

Coming out from a tunnel on the Llangollen Canal

Coming out from a tunnel

It is all part of the adventure and steering quickly becomes second nature, even if you can never entirely relax at the helm.

We take it in turns so one of us can be with the children, prepare food or even relax, lazing at the front, enjoying the scenery.

There’s something pretty awesome about travelling along in a floating home but I recommend mooring up as often as possible to explore the towpath and surroundings.

A family travels on a canal boat

We love stopping where we want, discovering walks through the countryside with just cows for company. This slow pace of travel needs to be embraced.

We also make planned stops at Chirk near to the famous castle, Ellesmere with its mere, playground, sculpture trail and quaint town centre, the small village of St Martin’s and also the base at Trevor, from where you can cross the famous aqueduct, a world heritage site, on foot.

As your confidence dealing with the boat increases, so does your speed carrying out its regular checks, filling with water and tying the ropes.

And the quality of our craft Askrigg really helps make the holiday (read our detailed review of the boat). It is one of Anglo Welsh’s Bond class boats and sleeps up to six (read our full review of it here).

A girl sits in the lounge of the bond boat Askrigg from Anglo Welsh

Inside our boat Askrigg

There is lots of space inside, two bedrooms, two bathrooms with showers, a well-equipped kitchen, lounge/dining area, television, radio, central heating and WiFi. It is also extremely clean and Covid compliant.

By the end of our mini-break it has become a home from home so as we head back over the aqueduct four days later, the view was just as stunning but any novice nerves about taking a canal boat holiday have disappeared.

RELATED CONTENT: Canal boat holiday guide for beginners – EVERYTHING you need to know

RELATED CONTENT: Our 10 top tips for taking children on a canal boat holiday

RELATED CONTENT: We review an Anglo Welsh canal boat with our children – is it family friendly?

RELATED CONTENT: Top 10 canal boat family holiday destinations in England and Wales

Drifters’ 2020 Fact Box

Drifters Waterway Holidays offers 550 canal boats for hire from 45 bases across England, Scotland and Wales.

There are over 3,000 miles of waterways for you to discover, all at your own pace and you don’t need to be an expert. Tuition is included as part of Drifters’ holiday packages.

Drifters’ 2020 hire prices for a boat for up to four people start at £530 for a short break (three or four nights), rising to £855 in the peak summer holidays.

A boat for up to four for a week starts at £915, rising to £1220 in the peak of the summer holidays.

Narrowboats range from 32ft to 70ft and can accommodate from two up to 12 people.

For more information visit the website or call 0344 984 0322.

More information about visiting the canal network is available from the Canal River Trust.

*We received a complimentary break for the purposes of this review. All views are our own.

Top tips for a family trip to the original Legoland in Billund, Denmark

Top tips for a family trip to the original Legoland in Billund, Denmark

All you need to know when visiting the home of LEGO in Billund, Denmark

Billund in Denmark is the home of Lego.

It is where the very first Lego toy brick was made in 1932. And where the first Legoland Park opened on June 7, 1968, next to the original Lego factory.

Legoland Billund is smaller, flatter and easier to get around than Legoland Windsor. Plus it’s just a 90-minute flight from the UK so makes a great alternative for Lego fans.

If you are planning a visit to Legoland Billund, make sure you read our 14 top tips below first and then our review.

1. How to get to Legoland Billund in Denmark

Legoland Billund is across the road from Billund Airport. You can fly there from Manchester, Heathrow and Stansted Airports. Ryanair fly from Stansted and Sun-Air, a British Airways partner, goes from Heathrow and Manchester.

We flew direct from Manchester with Sun-Air (which works in partnership with BA) on a tiny plane. The flight took 90 minutes.

2. Where to stay

It is expensive but you can stay stay at the park – at Legoland Hotel or Legoland Castle Hotel, a stay which can include park tickets, parking and early park access.

There is also Legoland Holiday Village, 450 metres from the entrance to Legoland.

But we stayed over the road at Lalandia Billund – an amazing water park resort, so got the best of both worlds. We stayed in a fantastic two-bedroomed lodge.

Lalandia

Lalandia

3. Best time to go to Legoland Billund

The busiest days at Legoland Billund are Tuesdays and Wednesdays while Saturdays are the quietest.

If you want to go over the summer, go as late as you can as Danish children usually go back to school towards the end of August so it will be quieter.

We found queues manageable despite visiting during the Easter holidays – there are lots of rides and plenty of space.

4. How to avoid the queues

Most people enter the park and start going on rides as soon as they see them so head straight to the back to avoid the crowds.

The longest queues when we went were in the Ninjago area which did mean a wait for Lloyd’s Laser Maze and the Ninjago Ride.

The Ninjago Ride

The Ninjago Ride

If you have Ninjago fans you could head there as soon as the gates open. Alternatively, the most popular rides are often quieter in the last 30 minutes before the park closes, although you may miss out altogether if you leave it too late.

To really save time queuing, splash out on the Q-Bot Reserve and Ride system. Instead of waiting in a queue at each attraction, you spend the waiting time elsewhere in the park. An Express pass reduces your waiting time by 50 per cent and an Ultimate pass means almost no waits in queues on your chosen rides, which can be a game changer when you have young children.

5. Layout

Legoland Billund is divided into themed areas.

The Miniland area is at its heart with recreations of everything from old Amsterdam to Star Wars, made out of Lego, which everyone will enjoy.

This park uses 65 million of the little bricks to build its displays.

There is a Duplo Land, Imagination Zone, Pirate Land, Knights’ Kingdom, Polar Land and Legoredo Town.

Duplo Land at Lego Billund

Duplo Land

Lego Ninjago World and Adventure Land are really popular.

Our favourite ride was the competitive Falck Fire Engine in Adventure Land. You work with your family to use a pump to move a fire engine and then spray out ‘fires’ while racing against other visitors on their fire engines.

Falck Fire Engine ride

Falck Fire Engine ride

The farthest end of the park is the quietest and we found a nice picnic spot by the penguin enclosure where we could watch them swimming while we ate.

6. Age appropriate

Unlike some theme parks, there is lots for little ones including Duplo Land for toddlers and Imagination Zone.

There are also enough rollercoasters to keep teenagers happy – so this suits all ages from two to 16.

A rollercoaster at Legoland Billund

There’s plenty for older children

Don’t forget to be aware of height and age restrictions, so children aren’t left disappointed on the day.

7. Food and drink

There are food and drink outfits but the options can be pricey. Plus they get very busy after 12.30pm so take your own food and drinks where possible, to enjoy in one of the picnic areas.

8. Language

This is obviously a Danish theme park but some of the 4D films are in English – check the times for these in advance.

9. Pushchairs

It’s a nice flat theme park and not overly huge but if little one’s legs get tired, there are pushchairs to hire.

10. Aquarium

If the weather is bad or you want a break from the rides then there is a good aquarium in the Imagination Zone called Atlantis by Sea Life.

Atlantis by Sea Life in Legoland Billund

Atlantis by Sea Life

It takes you on an expedition under the sea with a few bricks to find along the way. It doesn’t take very long but is a good spot to dry off or warm up and includes a tunnel under the water.

11. Special needs

The park is flat and all roads and paths are paved so wheelchairs users can go everywhere.

Those with a hidden disability such as anxiety, autism or ADHD can collect a ’show consideration’ wristband.

Disabled and ’show consideration’ access to rides is via the exits or sometimes through the Q-bot entrance.

12. Buying tickets

Buy online to save money and to save time queuing for tickets and download the free, official app to plan your trip.

13. Don’t miss the new Lego House

If you are after another Lego experience – try the big Lego House, which has opened in Billund and is within walking distance of Legoland.

This 12,000-square-metre house is filled with 25 million Lego bricks.

Here, children learn through play with Lego. The house also includes three restaurants and a Lego store.

Lego House in Billund

Lego House

14. The history

You can go to other Legoland parks, but only one place is the home of Lego.

Almost every visitor stops for an iconic photo outside the main entrance sign. Save time getting in by doing this at the end of the day not the beginning, when the shot will be more clear of people.

Conclusion

This park is not huge but it is historic and has enough to keep you entertained for a full day or a couple of days.

Advance entry starts from around 300DKK – about £30 – per person. For tickets and information visit the Legoland Billund website.

RELATED CONTENT: Will the home of LEGO live up to children’s expectations on a trip to LEGOLAND in Denmark?

RELATED CONTENT: We review a water park holiday resort opposite LEGOLAND in Denmark called Lalandia Billund

The entrance to Legoland in Billund, Denmark, when it opened in 1968/1969.

The entrance to Legoland when it opened in 1968/1969.



We visited as guests of the park to review it, all views are our own.

Merlin Entertainment attractions opening date and new safety measures announced

Merlin Entertainment attractions opening date and new safety measures announced

What will change at Merlin’s theme parks and other attractions when they reopen as Coronavirus restrictions are lifted

All Merlin Entertainment theme parks, attractions and accommodation are to reopen on July 4 for day visits and short breaks – with safety measures in place.

Alton Towers and Warwick Castle have been welcoming visitors since June 6 but they will be joined by Thorpe Park, LEGOLAND Windsor, Chessington World of Adventures Resort, the Blackpool Tower, SEA LIFE Centres and Madame Tussaud’s.

The attractions will be limiting visitor numbers to allow for social distancing.

All visitors must pre-book tickets online.

There will be safety measures in place including new routes around the attractions and new queuing formats.

Staff will wear PPE and carry out enhanced cleaning, in alignment with Government guidelines.

Nick Varney, Merlin Entertainments’ CEO, said: “We are delighted to be reopening following UK Government guidance.

“There has been a huge effort from our world class health and safety team, and all our teams across our attractions, to ensure we are ready to safely welcome guests back through our doors.

He said Merlin operates in 25 countries across four continents and the UK is the final country where attractions are still waiting to reopen fully.

“We look forward to welcoming guests from across the UK back to our sites, just as we have done successfully across Asia, Australia, New Zealand, Europe and North America,” he said.

“In each location, we have seen our guests embrace the ‘new normal’ and actively adhere to the new safety measures we have put in place.

“After the extended lockdown, we recognise that people need leisure and escapism and to make new happy memories with those they love. We look forward to helping them do just that.”

 

Home schooling: How to draw Mickey Mouse and over 20 other ideas from Orlando

Home schooling: How to draw Mickey Mouse and over 20 other ideas from Orlando

Visit Orlando unveils ideas to keep children entertained and educated during Coronavirus school closures

Orlando is bringing one of the most magical places on earth for children into their own homes in a bid to help millions struggling with home schooling.

Visit Orlando  has compiled a list of more than 20 free online learning activities to keep all ages entertained, engaged, and educated.

Lessons in science, art, biology and more take a fun twist as students can learn about space from astronauts, engineering from theme park designers and PE tips from a golf pro.

They can be found at the Visit Orlando blog.

Millions of families are not only learning how to school at home, but have also missed out on a fun vacation, so we hope this helps ease the pain on both fronts,” said George Aguel of Visit Orlando.

As the theme park capital of the world, Orlando is home to some of the most creative minds and entertainers out there, and our tourism industry has teamed together, using their skills to help kids and parents who are adapting to this current reality.

Creative activities

*Learn how to design theme parks, engineethrill rides and develop characters straight from Disney Imagineers in a free online program.

*Draw Mickey Mouse with Disney tutorials on the Disney Parks YouTube channel. Cast member Stephen Ketchum provides expert tips on how to draw the famous mouse from vintage 1920’s Mickey to the more contemporary version. 

Stephen Ketchum shows how to draw Mickey Mouse with Disney tutorials on the Disney Parks YouTube channel

Disney tutorials on the Disney Parks YouTube channel

*Characters from Disney, Pixar, Star Wars, Marvel, National Geographic and Disney Parks help with lessons on the new Disney Magic Moments website, from story times with celebrities to cooking recipes to educational activities.

Drawing a lion in Orlando

*Interact with droids in Star Wars: Galaxy’s Edge, test your Disney trivia, download official Disney playlists and more with Play Disney Parks, a mobile app that offers unique experiences and activities that bring the theme park environments to life.

*Go behind-the-scenes to learn how your favorite roller coasters run through the Science of Universal Orlando Resort program.

*Find live singalongs with celebrity musicians, techniques for sidewalk masterpiecesart tutorials, and a fun new craft each day on Crayola Experience‘s Facebook channel.

*Explore life’s oddities – such as how to make a shrunken head from an apple  on Ripley’s Believe It or Not! Odditoriums at home. Visit the website for a schedule of live Facebook content, at-home activities tailored for all ages, and unusual facts about famous people throughout history.

*Practice building flowers, dinosaurs and flying cars with the new LEGO challenges, tips and activities on the LEGOLAND Florida Facebook page.

*Young squires and princesses can revert back to medieval times by creating their own coat of chivalry or coloring a princess crown via the Medieval Times Dinner & Tournament – Orlando’s Facebook page.

Science

*Storytime from Space is a series of audiobooks read by real astronauts. Children can also learn about living in space, Mars and rocketry or tour Space Shuttle Atlantis during an ongoing series of Facebook lives from Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex. Parents can find additional downloadable activities here.

*Budding scientists can find videos on do-it-yourself projects like making rock and slime on the Orlando Science Center’s website. Other tutorials include making your own superhero training camp and creating dinosaur fossils.

A dinosaur at Orlando Science Center

Orlando Science Center

Biology Class Gone Wild

At 3pm daily, their YouTube channel shares live-action encounters with animals including Burmese pythons, crocodiles, alligators and lizards.

Baby alligators in Orlando

*Explore animals all over the world, including their habitats, dietsbehaviors and scientific classification, through SeaWorld Parks & Entertainment’s distance learning resources. The site includes hands-on classroom activities, teacher’s guides, videoand info books.

*Read with sea creatures duringUnder the Sea Story Times’ every Sunday and watch interactive and educational animal encounters on SEA LIFE Aquarium‘s Facebook page.

Sea Life in Orlando

Sea Life

*Pretend you’re exploring the jungle by listening to noises from nature, from sunrise in the swamp to giraffes munching their dinner. Wild Wednesday Nature Sounds is a new listening experience on Wild Florida‘s social channels.

Brain Games

*Put your problem-solving skills to the test through The Escape Game’s TEG Field Trips, with free online games that take students on virtual field trips through museums and historic landmarks by uncovering clues and solving puzzles.

Virtual PE

*PE goes online as students can practice their virtual swing at home with Topgolf‘s WGT Golf online or on mobile devices. Find additional resources like tips, drills and printable puzzles through their downloadable guide.

The Arts

*Learn how to juggle, face paint or dance like a Cirque du Soleil performer via CirqueConnect, a new digital content hub featuring a section devoted to kids’ content.

*#MUSEUMFROMHOME is with Orlando Museum of Art’s free online archives and social media channels, with options ranging from live video streams to critically acclaimed children’s book readings, to art-inspired colouring books.

*Comedy and magic come together to teach lessons about bullying, during two full-length productions filmed live onstage of ‘Pip-Squeak, An Anti-Bullying Magic Show,’ presented by The Orlando Repertory Theater, in partnership with Tony Brent.

History

*In times of crisis, it is important to be a helper. The Holocaust Memorial & Resource Center of Florida is encouraging children to share their stories of how they have helped others through YouTube video submissions.

*Learn about native Americans, pioneers and famous people in history on the Orange County Regional History Center’s website, with activities ranging from historic coloring pages to lesson plans to virtual tours of recent exhibitions.

National Trust now CLOSES its park and gardens to help stop coronavirus spread

National Trust now CLOSES its park and gardens to help stop coronavirus spread

National Trust closes its parklands from March 21

The National Trust has now CLOSED its parks and gardens to help restrict the spread of coronavirus.

The trust had been offering people free entry to its open spaces despite indoor areas being closed.

But there were crowds of visitors taking up the opportunity which made social distancing tricky.

Director General Hilary McGrady said: “Despite our desire to keep our outdoor spaces open, the health and wellbeing of our staff, volunteers and visitors has to be our top priority.

“We have now sadly taken the decision to close all of our parks and gardens, in addition to our houses, shops and cafes, to avoid crowding that puts social distancing at risk.

“We know that people are likely to need space and fresh air in the coming weeks and months and we will do all we can to provide access wherever possible.

“Our countryside and coastal locations remain open with parking charges waived, but we encourage people to stay local and observe social distancing measures.

“Over the coming weeks our digital platforms – our website, social media feeds, podcasts and video – will become even more important, ensuring the places of nature, beauty and history that we care for on behalf of the nation can remain open for business virtually while we are temporarily closed.

“We will also be ramping up our efforts to help people connect with nature wherever they are and to find moments of joy in the world around them. We will be providing rich content and staying in touch with our members and followers throughout this time.”

For more information go to www.nationaltrust.org.uk.

Coronavirus home-school guide: How to teach your children, have fun and stay calm!

Coronavirus home-school guide: How to teach your children, have fun and stay calm!

What to do with children at home during schools closures and our top tips to educate them

Schools have shut and parents all over the country are wondering how best to look after their children at home.

It’s daunting to realise you are now their sole educator for the foreseeable future.

It’s also a challenging time for children – they can’t see their friends and have lost the security of their usual routine and activities.

But now they are away from playground chat about Coronavirus, we can shield them better from anxiety and make this as positive a time as we can for them.

After all, they are living through a period which will be remembered in history – one day they could be telling their grandchildren about the time schools closed.

So, let them remember it for all the good stuff, when they got to spend quality time with the people who love them most.

Where they played games, had fun and learned about things that really mattered to them and interested them.

Read, explored hobbies and passions but above all felt loved and secure at a time when the world around them was confusing and different.

We’ve put together some ideas to help you.

But whatever you do or don’t manage, please don’t feel inadequate or guilty.

EVERYONE is in the same boat. Children are not at school, remember, you are a parent not a teacher.

Timetables and routine

Children respond well to a routine. And their normal schedule has been taken away from them.

You can make a timetable to add structure to their days and a lot of children benefit from having a visual plan in place.

I’m going to attempt to get my children up and dressed first thing – wish me luck, they do love a pyjama day!

I’m also hoping to set aside periods for learning, reading, exercise and creative time but will be flexible and lead by them.

Make sure to set aside good chunks of time for child-led play.

Remember, this is NOT the time to be nagging or upsetting children if they really don’t want to do something.

And if they don’t learn much some days? Don’t worry!

Exercise

Children need plenty of exercise.

Besides keeping their fitness levels up, they’ll feel happier, more positive and more energised if they keep active.

*You could start the day with a PE session – body coach Joe Wickes is doing a free PE lesson at 9am every weekday on YouTube #PEwithJoe.

PE with Joe

*When allowed out, plan a daily walk or jog and try different routes, keeping well away from other people. If you are feeling particularly enthusiastic, make a treasure hunt of things to find or collect bits for a picture!

Keep a safe distance from others and avoid playgrounds and anywhere where children may touch surfaces.

*Plan your own PE sessions in the garden or obstacle courses.

Adapt learning to match their interests

Example: Harry Potter

I have two Harry Potter fans so, I am really thrilled to have found some amazing resources which will combine one of their favourite subjects with ways to learn and be creative.

The Ultimate Harry Potter Project – this blog gives some fantastic wizarding ideas as trialled by a Harry Potter-loving family like potion making, wand making, a Quidditch creation and how to make Mandrakes.

And this site provides loads of carefully made Harry Potter printables like crosswords, words searches, colouring pages and maths worksheets.

And of course, encourage them to dress up and play and let their imaginations run wild.

Topics

Take a topic and research the subject together then do different activities relating to it.

I’m going to try making our own volcanoes, write about them, make poems and paint pictures of them after being inspired by this great website Ways To Learn Through Play At Home (by SEN Resources Blog) and its fantastic YouTube videos.

Life skills

This is the best time you will ever have to learn life skills together such as:

*Gardening: A lot of children love helping in the garden. I’m not exactly green-fingered but I’ve bought packets of seeds and ordered biodegradable seed pots to get us started.

*Decorate (with care): This is potentially a good time to spruce up the house. I’ve splashed out on a huge tub of emulsion and a new roller and have optimistic visions of us all having a go at this together, which could all go horribly wrong. We are also going to have a go at painting the shed.

*Cooking and baking: My two always love to make cakes and biscuits but I’m hoping they’ll enjoy trying some other easy recipes.

*Even cleaning and housework can sometimes be fun!

Virtual playdates

Make sure they don’t lose touch with their friends by arranging regular video calls for them.

We are loving Facebook Messenger where you can do group video chats. There are some hilarious filters you can use too.

It’s also proved a saviour for me and my friends later on in the evenings, with wine in hand!

It’s easy to use, just open Facebook Messenger, select a friend/friends or a group as if you were writing a message then press the video camera icon. To get the filters, press the smiley face.

I saw one mum had asked all the children in a group call who could find various items, which proved entertaining.

One-on-one time

Set a timer and dedicate all your attention to one child.

Let them choose exactly what they want to do and be enthusiastic and supportive.

Do the same with all your children and give the others something to occupy them if possible while they wait their turn, without (good luck with this) interrupting!

Reading

Read to your children, get them to read to you and give them time to read alone. I’ve got two little book worms and it’s one of our biggest joys.

A girl reads a book

Also Amazon Audible has made hundreds of titles free during the Coronavirus.

And World Book Online has made its collection of over 3,000 ebooks and audiobooks available for free for children to access at home.

Plus, there are lots of children’s authors doing online read-alouds and activities, find out more here.

Coding

If your children like coding or want to learn, a company called Code Camp which teaches children aged 7 to 12 to code, has scrapped its subscription fees during this period.

LEGO

Loads of children love LEGO and it helps develop lots of skills including fine motor skills.

If they are really keen, you can print out a free 30-day LEGO challenge here.

30 day LEGO challenge

Make a diary

This is a time they will remember. Use this free printable stay-at-home diary.

Blue Peter Badges

If you have children aged six to 15, apply for a Blue Peter badge. And then they’ll have over 200 places to visit for free until they’re 16, once they are allowed out again.

Planet Earth

On BBC iPlayer they have episodes of Planet Earth. One mum played them for her children and quizzed them at the end of each episode.

Pictures in the window

Children have been painting a picture of a rainbow or something else of their choice to put in the window for their friends to see when they walk past to keep everyone smiling. It’s the #frommywindow initiative.

If you are working from home

Everything is far more challenging when you are trying to work too.

Make sure your colleagues and employers know that you have children at home with you so they have realistic expectations of what you can achieve.

If you have partner who is also working from home, try to take shifts.

Give children activities which don’t need as much supervision where possible.

Accept that the children will have more screen time.

Most importantly – have lots of fun

Try everything you all enjoy – have pillow fights, have a movie night, play music and dance, sing, play tig, make dens, camp in the garden, laugh and be silly.

Concentrate on your children as much as possible, let them mess up the house, give them the freedom to play.

Finally

There has been a great deal of advice and links and websites to help us muddle through this crazy time.

But this has been one of the best things I have read. The author is said to be an experienced home educator who wishes to remain anonymous.

Tips for PARENTS OF SCHOOL CHILDREN who might be spending a lot of time at home together in the near future, because 😷🦠.

Hopefully these are some useful tips/thoughts/experience from a HOME EDUCATOR’S PERSPECTIVE on what can work at home. NB: this is what works for us and all families are different, so take however much is useful to you and leave the rest. Bare in mind, if your child is receiving work to do at home from school, that external factor may give quite a different dynamic to home ed, so your experiences may differ too. But I still hope some bits of this might be useful.

1. Replicating school at home doesn’t work. This is a truth almost universally acknowledged in home ed groups by parents who tried it, including qualified teachers. Naturally sometimes parents begin home ed in a school-like manner, perhaps after removing a child from school, thinking that’s the way to go. But it seems 9/10 times families quickly discover this is a route to frustration for children and parents. So if this happens to you, don’t worry, it’s perfectly normal, read on for alternatives 🙂

2. It’s fine for children to be bored. Actually it’s good for children to be bored. Perhaps not all the time, but definitely sometimes. Boredom breeds creativity. Our minds cannot stay idle, so inevitably they find something to do, and often they find surprising and interesting things. Isaac Newton began his discovery of gravity at home when Cambridge University closed because of the plague. Shakespeare also wrote some of his best regarded plays while hiding in the countryside from the plague. Possibly if feeling bored is unusual for a child, they might find it uncomfortable at first, but rest assured it is good and valuable. Parents, we do not always have to ‘solve’ boredom.

3. Schools spend less time on learning than you might think. There are several calculations by teachers-turned-home-educators that attempt to quantify actual learning time in schools. When the breaks and moving around and getting things out and putting things away and controlling behaviour and setting expectations and golden time and school photos, and last day of term, and a million other things are taken into account, how much focussed learning time is left on average per day? The calculations range from 45 minutes to 2 hours. Consider scaling back your own expectations accordingly.

4. Learning doesn’t have to be at a table with a worksheet. Oodles can be learnt through cooking, gardening, household tasks*, reading stories to each other, board games, card games, toys and roleplay, sewing and knitting, art and crafts, DIY, servicing a car or bike, music, radio, discussing the news, magazines, documentaries… Some families find that things learnt in an active practical way can stick better than learning on paper.
* Yes cleaning really can be educational – think of all the science involved in descaling a sink, enzymes in washing up liquid, microbes on surfaces, dissolving stains in solvents…

5. You don’t have to already know everything your child needs/wants to learn. Welcome questions and try to find answers together if you don’t know. Actually you might want to search for answers together even if you do know, because how to find things out for yourself is a valuable skill for kids to develop. In periods when children’s questions aren’t forthcoming, try voicing your own questions out loud while you go about your tasks, or ask kids their opinion on something to start a discussion. For older kids (we aren’t there yet) it seems to be about helping them find resources (people, clubs, books, courses) that they can learn from. ‘Facilitator not teacher’ is a phrase sometimes used.

6. Learning doesn’t have to happen in school hours. You probably have the children with you longer than they would be in school, so you have the option to pick times when they are more receptive, or that fit with family needs. Some families come to consider all-day every-day as learning time, by noticing and using learning possibilities in all of everyday life.

(7. Because I can’t not mention it after 4 and 6: home learning doesn’t have to happen at home. Unfortunately right now there may be No, or Very Limited, options to go out – follow the advice for your country. But rest assured that there are some (many) home educating families who usually go out a lot, and they may well be having similar challenges staying at home as school families do).

8. Set expectations/ have a rhythm. This might be very individual, but what works for us, while not being too rigid, is to have a pattern of when we do activities together and when we don’t. Eg you might come together to do a joint activity in the morning after breakfast. And during meal prep and clear up might be independent play/activities that they choose themselves. I find I still need to remind frequently that I won’t be taking part in complicated parent-dependant activities when I’m in the middle of clearing up the lunch carnage! And reminding of the slots when we do those things together really helps.

9. Consider including quiet time/a break for everyone. Ours coincides with the toddler’s afternoon nap. But even before a younger sibling, we found it helpful to have a quiet break after lunch. This is when I get some quiet thinking/headtasks time (those things not being at all compatible with awake toddlers). The older one might have some screen time, and/or she usually has creative projects that she wants to work on. It took us some practice to get this going well.

10. Having a bad day? However crazy and distracting your household (younger siblings, pets, deliveries, illness, broken washing machines…) is it truly more crazy and distracting than 30 other kids? Or, if you feel like you didn’t give enough attention to your child today, was it really less than 1/30th of the attention of the teacher at school? Probably not. These can be helpful thoughts, especially on a bad day.

11. Minimise prep, or include the kids in preparing for future activities. Because, quite differently to a teacher, you have these kids with you *all the time*. If you can’t find a way to get it done together, it probably isn’t going to happen. I try not to use the quiet time/break for prepping because that isn’t a really a break and I wouldn’t emerge sufficiently refreshed for getting through the rest of the day.

12. Look for activities that you get something out of as well as the kids. This is how to stay sane. Do as many of these as possible.

13. Atmosphere. You can always subtly change how a situation feels by putting on music, changing lighting, opening a window…

14. Lead by example. Do you wish your child would show an interest in something (more) wholesome (than what they’re doing right now)? What might happen if you gather some interesting objects on the table, and some paper and pencils, and begin drawing? Or put on some exercise clothes and get out your yoga mat and video? Make sure to just casually happen to have some spare pencils & paper/floorspace nearby ready for any requests to join in. Play it cool and don’t be obvious about hoping they’ll take an interest, and keep an open mind about what follows. This can work with so many activities. They might choose to join in, or they might not this time. But chances are they’ll have noticed, and you hopefully got to do something you enjoyed for a short time, and you’ve set a great example, and… sometimes interesting responses emerge much later. 😉

15. Don’t compare. Inevitably we tend to share the highlights where a child made something we’re proud of. We don’t share the moment when the floor can’t be seen, every opportunity provided for doing something wholesome has failed all morning, both the kids are screaming because you dared to use the loo, lunch is hours late, and the toddler has smeared poo on the coffee table. 🤦 But even with the highlights, just because a friend seems to do lots of X or Y, doesn’t mean we all should. Families are different, so focus on what works for yours. Including, ignoring all of the above advice if you think that’s best!

Good luck and enjoy!

More ideas and free resources for home learning

Twinkl

This website has loads of great teaching resources and is offering a free access code UKTWINKLHELPS.

https://chatterpack.net/blogs/blog/resources-list-for-home-learning

https://kidsactivitiesblog.com/135609/list-of-education-companies-offering-free-subscriptions/

https://classroommagazines.scholastic.com/support/learnathome/grades-1-2.html

https://www.forbes.com/sites/tarahaelle/2020/03/15/101-ideas-to-keep-your-kids-busy-during-coronavirus-closures/#1ed3fe4774a4

https://blog.learningresources.co.uk/free-home-learning-resources-for-families/

We’d love to hear how you are getting on, let us know below!