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Answer these questions before booking an all-inclusive hotel for you and your children

All-inclusive holidays have never been as popular as they are now in 2018.

Holidaymakers on all-inclusive breaks can relax knowing after paying one price up front, all their meals and drinks have been paid for in advance. But it certainly doesn’t suit everybody.

So should you and your family go all-inclusive or not? The answer depends on you, your budget and where you’re going. Our comprehensive guide can help you decide.

What is all inclusive?

All-inclusive usually means that the accommodation, meals, drinks (soft and alcoholic) and entertainment are included in the cost. Some or all activities can also be added and occasionally also the airfare.

Where are you going?

It is important to take into consideration your destination when deciding whether to go all-inclusive.

In general the more familiar, cheaper and developed the location, the easier self-catering or a non all-inclusive hotel stay, will be.

In places like France and Spain, there are often nearby supermarkets, restaurants and bars, selling food and drink at reasonable prices.

But in destinations such as Mexico, parts of the Caribbean, Morocco and Cuba, there may be a lack of self-catering accommodation, limited restaurants and food can be expensive to buy. Also if safety is an issue you may be better off staying at and eating at a big resort.

So, unless you are a seasoned traveller, confident being out and about in less-developed areas with your children, staying at a hotel and eating there can be the more sensible option in some areas.

What do you want from your holiday?

If you want to relax away from the stresses of everyday life, with nothing to plan, everything taken care of for you, food prepared, drinks poured and entertainment for you and your children on the doorstep then all-inclusive could be for you.

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But if you are adventurous, keen to explore the area, visit attractions and try out local restaurants, you may be better off self-catering, else you’ll be paying for food and drinks more than once and staying somewhere there is less incentive to leave. Self-catering also suits people who enjoy planning and are good at sticking to a budget while away.

We took a self-catering trip to Italy (read about it here) where we did a mix of cooking and eating out at lunchtime which kept costs lower than an all-in hotel.

How many people are going?

The bigger the group the easier all-inclusive may be. We recently took an all-inclusive trip to Fuerteventura (read about it here).

There were 11 of us, aged three to 70, and for us, all-inclusive was more straightforward.

It meant the children didn’t have to sit for ages waiting in restaurants for food as we ate buffet-style quickly and easily, there was something for all tastes and there were no worries about the bill or paying for drinks.

A villa is another good alternative for a big group. You can split the cost of accommodation, food and drink and take it in turns to cook. You will also have more space than a hotel room with communal spaces to socialise.

How long do you want to stay?

One complaint often levelled at all-inclusives is that it gets a bit samey. Same food, same pool, same activities.

A week suits us but I know people who love two weeks, as they feel they can really relax.

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Pick a good all-inclusive like this one in Gran Canaria with three or four restaurants and you might find you have enough variety for 10 to 14 days.

The other way to break things up is to get out on excursions or attractions to keep the scenery fresh.

What is included?

Check what is included before you book an all-inclusive as it varies from resort to resort and some travellers end up paying for things they expected to be covered.

Added extras can include bottled water, snacks, activities, resort fees, hotel safe and Wi-Fi charges (and Wi-Fi is sometimes only available in the hotel reception).

Meals

There are usually one or two main buffet restaurants serving similar food.

There can be other restaurants such as Japanese, Thai or Asian eateries, which can be buffet-style or à la carte.

Sometimes only meals in the main buffet area are included in the cost and you have to pay to eat in any other restaurants.

Others allow a restricted number of visits to other restaurants while expensive all-inclusives may have no limit.

Sometimes there may be a cost for items like lobster and steak.

Often you have to reserve tables in all but the main buffet restaurants in advance. Check first as this can be before the holiday or on set days while you are there. Also ask whether there is a dress code.

The food package sometimes includes snacks and ice cream between meals.

Fresh fruit at breakfast

Drinks

For some people the free (well, included) drinks is the biggest draw as bar tabs can get very expensive.

Often it is the local brands of drinks (such as spirits and wine) that are given, with charges for imported brands.

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But  high-end all-inclusives can include premium brand international drinks. At more expensive resorts, you may also have waiter service on the beach, fetching you drinks and cocktails as you relax on a sun lounger or, more likely, build sandcastles.

Minibars in some all-inclusives include free drinks and snacks but check first. At the same time confirm whether room service is free.

Cocktails on the beach

So how much do you drink? 

If you are a family of four, we calculate that both adults need to be at least moderate drinkers to save money going all-inclusive.

In a country like France where a decent bottle of wine can cost about £3, you won’t save a lot so assess the destination and be honest about your drinking!

Activities

The activities included in the cost vary enormously, so check first. They can include non-motorised water sports like kayaking and paddleboarding, beach games, exercise classes, water aerobics, water sports and scuba diving. So it is a good opportunity to try out new things. There may also be a games room, tennis courts, gym, children’s clubs, water park, playground or mini golf.

Normally you will pay for motorised water sports, spa treatments, excursions and babysitting.

Entertainment

Check the entertainment schedule straight away so that you don’t miss something you may enjoy.

There can be discos, live shows, children’s discos, children’s magic shows, character breakfasts etc. The quality also varies considerably between hotels so check out reviews.

Cancellation fee

Double check before what happens if you have to cancel your trip, will you lose the whole all-inclusive cost including meals? Make sure you have a good travel insurance policy.

Do you need to tip?

Lots of people like not having to carry cash around but tipping is welcomed at some hotels, find out the resort or culture’s tipping policy in advance.

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Tipping is usually appreciated but not required to recognise good service to staff including bartenders, servers and housekeepers.

Will you save money?

Here comes the crunch – is all-inclusive it cheaper? Unsurprisingly the answer is sometimes yes and sometimes no. Let’s do a quick comparison.
We price-tested a week to the Costa del Sol at May half-term for a family of four.

All-inclusive prices (flights, transfer, hotel, food and drink) range from £2,500 to £3,200 for a decent four-star resort.

Now the DIY option. Flights come out at £350 per person for four people (total £1,400). A comparable hotel with breakfast included, ranges from £800 to £1,000. That gives us a total of £2,200-2,400, leaving £800 for a week’s food and drink. That is the true cost of the all-inclusive.

Meals out in the Costa Del Sol at a reasonable restaurant would be around £60 for a family of four. So it comes down to lunch and how much booze you want.

A wallet with money on top

Will you save money going all-inclusive?

In conclusion

An all-inclusive resort can be cheaper if you take advantage of all they have to offer but often the cost is comparable, so it is about choice and what will work best for your family.

We have always thoroughly enjoyed all-inclusives with our young children, in between other more active and adventurous breaks.

I love the huge range of food and beautiful pools and our children like the familiarity of being in one resort and getting to know what to do and where everything is. We still try to get out and about a bit too to explore the area to achieve the perfect balance.

 

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