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How to protect your family from germs on a plane – all the precautions you need to take

I’ve always been a bit OTT when it comes to germs and my children – I’m the mum brandishing a hand gel at parties and soft play.

But the spreading coronavirus has seen us all improve our hygiene standards.

Getting ill can ruin a holiday – so how can we keep our children – and ourselves – as protected as possible when we travel?

Here we explain the extra precautions families can take to look after themselves while flying.

Passengers getting on a full plane

Aeroplanes and germs

Aeroplanes are pretty amazing – they transport us quickly to fantastic destinations all over the world.

But they can also be breeding grounds for germs and bacteria – the result of packing lots of people into an enclosed space for hours at a time.

Studies say that one in five people will get sick after flying, so how can we help prevent our children – and ourselves – from getting ill?

Before the flight

When you travel on a plane, your immune system is challenged by dehydration, lower oxygen levels and other factors, weakening your body’s defence against infections.

But you can boost your children’s immune system to prepare their bodies for flying.

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If a child has plenty of sleep and eats healthily before the flight, their immunity will perform better.

Where to sit

Believe it or not, some seats carry a higher risk than others.

Passengers are more vulnerable to illness if they sit in an aisle seat – they receive the most contact and potential contamination from potentially poorly people walking up and down and holding on to head rests.

So put children by the window if possible, where there are less germs.

Also try to not sit your child next to someone who is ill, instead take the seat yourself or discretely ask a flight attendant if you can move seats.

You are less at risk sitting behind someone who is ill or coughing than in front.

Also avoid sitting too near to the toilets if possible as these areas are busier. Plus, people spending more time there may be the sick ones.

Aisle seats on a plane

Avoid aisle seats

Wash hands

Washing hands regularly, especially before you eat, is the BEST way to prevent illness, wherever you are. Help children to wash hands and teach them how to do it properly. Show them how to use warm soap and water, scrub all over for 20 seconds, then rinse and dry.

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Discourage children from touching their faces as bugs can be transmitted to their mouth, nose or eyes. And tell them not to put anything in their mouths.

Hand sanitiser

Hand sanitiser removes most bacteria and viruses from hands so use it regularly and before eating and drinking.

Even if children have just been to the toilet and washed their hands, they are likely to have touched seats or other areas on the way back to their seats.

Tell children to rub the gel all over their hands until it is dry. Apply it thoroughly including between fingers.

Supervise young children as it is dangerous if ingested and store hand gel in a bag away from them and to avoid spillages.

A girl touching a plane window

Surfaces

Germs can last for up to seven days inside a plane.

Most germ viruses are transferred by touching not just breathing the air. There are several hotspots on a plane and one of the worst offenders is the tray table.

Children love a tray table. To be safe you can wipe it down with an alcohol-based wipe or gel. Experts also recommend you wipe armrests, seatbealt buckles, screens and remote controls.

There is often a quick turnaround time between flights so these areas do not always get thoroughly cleaned and disinfected.

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In-flight magazines and seat pockets

Passengers often use the seat pockets as bins and air crew find dirty nappies and used tissues in them among rubbish left behind, so try not to use them if possible.

They contain a lot of bacteria but wipes can’t properly disinfect the fabric of the pocket.

Seat pockets on a plane

In-flight magazines are touched by hundreds of people and are never cleaned so they are full of germs. Avoid!

Water

One of the best ways to stay healthy during a flight is to drink lots and lots of water.

Ensure children drink more than they would at home as they will get dehydrated and then the mucous membranes in the nose and throat will dry up which protect us from most diseases encountered.

Everyone should avoid coffee, alcohol and sugary drinks when flying, which will dehydrate you even more.

Toilets

Aeroplane toilets are a big source of germs.

Avoid touching surfaces in there and turn off the taps and open the door while holding a paper towel.

Aircraft air vents

Vents

The air coming out of the vents is meant to be cleaner than the air around your seat as it is filtered, so leaving them on a low setting can move the germs away.

However, you may want to use hand gel after touching the vent as it is another bacteria hotspot!

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Blankets and pillows

Bring your own blankets and pillows for children to use. If you ask for them and they aren’t wrapped, they may not be clean.

Plus having a familiar blanket and pillow to curl up with may also make children happier.

Screens on a plane for entertainment

Entertainment

Bring your own entertainment for children so that they don’t touch onboard touchscreens which have a lot of germs from dirty fingers, coughs and sneezes. Or otherwise wipe them first!

Other Germ-Fighting Travel Tips

Hotels

Health experts suggest wiping down remote controls, light switches, telephones, doorknobs, toilet seat handles and taps to protect children.

Swimming pools

Chlorination does not kill all bacteria. Teach young children to avoid swallowing water in pools and water parks. And make sure they shower after getting out of the pool.

HOWEVER!

If you are going on holiday, do NOT let worry and anxiety spoil a trip.

Arm yourself with hand sanitiser and a bit of knowledge.

And don’t scare your children! Just make them aware of basic hygiene.

Wishing you happy, healthy holidays.

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